A Spoonful of Water

In 1960, ‘Spoonful’ was written by Mississippi-born Willie Dixon (1915-92), who was a key architect in sculpting the trajectory of post-war Chicago electric blues.  Dixon was working for Chicago-based Chess Records and this song was released on their label.  The single was sung by Chester Burnett aka Howlin’ Wolf (1910-76) and it became one of the most influential and much-covered recordings in its catalogue.  Howlin’ Wolf grew up in a poor family where people often came over to borrow food or a spoonful of this, and spoonful of that.  The idea of ‘Spoonful’ is that it doesn’t take a large quantity of anything to be adequate.  It shows how men search to satisfy their cravings, whether that be for something of sustenance or love.  It uses a spoonful of various pleasures, and it says that men will lie, cry and die to get what they desire.

‘Spoonful’ has been listed in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as one of the “500 Songs that Shaped Rock and Roll”, and Rolling Stone Magazine ranked it #221 on their list of the 500 greatest songs of all time.  Howlin’ Wolf was six feet three inches tall, and weighed in at 300lbs, making him an imposing figure of a man.  Howlin’ Wolf made this song sexual when he played it at his shows.  He’d grab a big cooking spoon that drummer Sam Lay bought him at a flea market and brandish it at crotch-level, engaging in blatantly phallic monkeyshines.  Howlin’ Wolf was backed by a top-notch studio band comprising the guitarists Hubert Sumlin and Freddie Robinson, pianist Otis Spann, Fred Below on drums, and Dixon on the double-bass when he recorded this song.  Wolf described desire as an incurable addiction that can drive people to murder and madness.  Boasting great power and intensity, it was unequivocally a record that made an indelible mark on many of its listeners, particularly for its memorable line, “One spoon of love from my 45 will save you from another man.”

Willie Dixon made many records and he wrote or co-wrote over 500 songs, he was a Grammy-winning inductee into the Blues Hall Of Fame and he is best remembered for authoring a raft of classic blues tunes that were recorded by a number of significant artists at Chess Records in the 50s and early 60s.  His greatest songs include Hoochie Coochie Man (Muddy Waters), ‘You Can’t Judge A Book By The Cover’ (Bo Diddley), ‘My Babe’ (Little Walter), ‘The Red Rooster’ (Howlin’ Wolf), ‘Wang Dang Doodle’ (Koko Taylor), ‘Bring It On Home’ (Sonny Williamson II) and ‘I Just Want To Make Love To You’ (Etta James).  Dixon was a brilliant songwriter whose tunes helped power the postwar Chicago electric blues surge spearheaded by the Wolf and Muddy Waters.  Dixon established the Hoochie Coochie Music publishing company after his first hit ‘Hoochie Coochie Man’, to protect his songs.

Dixon was a postwar 20th century black man claiming his due and protecting it according to the rules of the white-run economic and legal systems he lived under.  When you copyright a song, you own the rights to it and you are protected from anyone using and profiting from your work, without your permission, but Led Zeppelin seemed to operate on the principle that it was better to ask for forgiveness than permission, as they took a lot of the Willie Dixon song ‘You Need Love’ to create their ‘Whole Lotta Love’ and only seven years separate these songs from each other.  In 1985, Dixon sued Led Zeppelin for plagiarizing his songs and this was settled out of court.  Dixon drew his materials from his deep knowledge of blues traditions, snatching pieces from here and there and revamping them into new forms.  Then he claimed authorship of the results via copyright.

Many of the old blues artists did not copyright their work, so they didn’t own the rights to their recordings or publishing and it is possible that Dixon borrowed inspiration and more from these old songs.  ‘Spoonful’ wasn’t the first blues song to reference addiction, and it could be considered a later descendent of early blues man Charley Patton who recorded ‘A Spoonful Blues’ in 1929, which in turn was influenced by Papa Charlie Jackson’s 1925 recording of ‘All I Want Is A Spoonful’, who used spoonful to mean a small amount of (sexual) love from his woman.  Papa Charlie Jackson was born in New Orleans around 1890.  Jackson asks his love object for just a bit of loving, a spoonful from his sweet mama.  He tells her that it is not necessary to call or write, she can brown some gravy, or fry him a steak, but his goal is love.  He wants his woman to give him a spoonful, a minimal dose of satisfying love which he pleads for.  Piedmont blues player Luke Jordan started his professional career when he was 35, and he recorded a mere handful of tunes before his voice gave out.  Many people say that his 1927 ‘Cocaine Blues’ provided Charley Patton and later on Dixon with raw materials for their work.

Mississippi John Hurt, born in Mississippi in 1892, was rediscovered during the postwar folk revival.  After failed tries at a music career, he worked as a farm hand while perfecting his complex fingerpicking.  Except for a couple of recordings, no one knew anything about him, till a folk musicologist found him by following clues in his lyrics.  Hurt toured widely for the first time, wowing young white audiences at venues like the 1963 Newport Folk Festival.  In ‘Coffee Blues’, Hurt describes his need to see his girlfriend about “a lovin’ spoonful, my lovin’ spoonful.”  Mississippi John Hurt used a Maxwell House advertising phrase in his ‘Coffee Blues’, saying “good to the last drop” which had been introduced in 1917.  Charley Jordan was born in rural Arkansas in 1890, and he recorded ‘Just A Spoonful’ in 1930.  His signature tune ‘Keep It Clean’, provided inspiration for Willie Dixon to write ‘The Signifying Monkey’ and for Chuck Berry to compose ‘Reelin’ and Rockin’’.

The 1960s pop group The Lovin’ Spoonful took their name from this metaphor for ejaculate.  Normal semen volume produced by the average human male  during orgasm ranges from 1.5 ml to 5 ml and there are 4.92892 milliliters (mL) in a teaspoon, so this would make be at least 7 spoonful’s.  Although Wolf’s version of ‘Spoonful’ didn’t chart when it was released in 1960, the Willie Dixon song became a Top 20 US R&B duet for Etta James and Harvey Fuqua, who were billed together as Etta & Harvey.  Theirs had a similar swagger to Wolf’s version but, with its softer, more sophisticated arrangement featuring horns, a new bridge section, and key changes, it lacked the visceral intensity of the original.

It could be a spoonful of coffee
It could be a spoonful of tea
But one little spoon of your precious love
Is good enough for me

Men lie about that spoonful
Some cry about that spoonful
Some die about that spoonful
Everybody fight about a spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful

It could be a spoonful of water
To save you from the desert sand
But one spoon of love from my forty-five
Will save you from another man
Men lie about that spoonful
Some cry about that spoonful
Some die about that spoonful
Everybody fight about a spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful

It could be a spoonful of sugar
It could be a spoonful of tea
But one little spoon of your precious love
Is good enough for me
Men lie about that spoonful
Some cry about that spoonful
Some die about that spoonful
Everybody fight about a spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful
That spoon, that spoon, that spoonful

It could be a spoonful of sugar
It could be a spoonful of tea
But one little spoon of your precious love
Is good enough for me

Written for Song Lyric Sunday where the prompt is Air/Earth/Fire/Water.

Four Elements

The twelve zodiac signs are grouped into the four elements of air, earth, fire and water.  Greek philosopher Empedocles wrote that the world was comprised of earth, air, fire and water.  Later on, aether was added as the fifth element and some cultures called this the void.  This is a bit different from the Bruce Willis movie, The Fifth Element.  Sometimes you get five basic natural forces being fire, water, earth, sky and wind, but this could also be listed as fire, water, earth, air and spirit.  Air is basically invisible, but we know it is there as we breathe air all the time and we need it to support life.  It carries sounds and supports birds in flight.  The earth is seen as anything that is material, physical, and tangible, and it is a stable source of support.  Fire is intense and smoldering and if you play with fire you may get burnt.  Water is fluid and it can be seen trickling from a fountain, or circling around in your toilet when you flush it.  It rages in rivers, and it can freeze to become ice, or be heated to become steam.

Last week we had More and everyone was asked to find a song with the superlative related prompts of Best/Better/Good/Great.  This week we have the element prompts of Air/Earth/Fire/Water and hopefully this will fit for everyone.  Take some time to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this music challenge, as you will probably find many enjoyable songs and it is quite possibly that you will learn a thing or two.  Share your music with others and post a video, try do some research and let everyone know something about the song that you post.  Show the lyrics, let’s all listen to our favorite songs and explore some new music.  Try to find a song that fits the prompt, then write your post and create a pingback, or you can just place your link in the comments section.

Attention – The Great Bloggers’ Bake-Off is taking place next week, which looks like a lot of fun, so try to join in with your best recipes and photos.  Hey good lookin’, what you got cooking, how about cooking something up for me?

Here are the “rules”:
• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not.  If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post or place your link in the comments section below.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

I am writing about the Willie Dixon song ‘Spoonful’ this week.  Next week I will be writing about the song ‘Foolish Heart’ by the Grateful Dead.  The upcoming prompts will be:
July 19, 2020 – Baking/Bread/Cake/Pie/Picnic Suggested by Caramel (Learner At Love) aka Melody
July 26, 2020 – Different/Same
August 2, 2020 – Acquire/Collect/Gather/Secure
August 9, 2020 – A song with a harmonica

I Can Love You Better Than Him

‘Hard to Handle’ was written by Allen Jones, Al Bell, and Otis Redding and it was released on his 1967 album The Immortal Otis Redding.  This song charted #15 in the UK and it reached #51 in the US.  Al Bell was a career music industry affiliate, as a DJ, producer, songwriter and record executive.  He is best known for co-founding Stax Records.  Allen Jones was also a record producer, a writer and recording engineer at Stax records.  Redding had a career total of 11 Top 40 hits in the Billboard charts, an astounding achievement for somebody who did not live to see his 27th birthday.

Otis experiments with James Brown-style funk in this song backed by Booker T Jones on piano, anchored by percussive horns and driven by a groovy Duck Dunn bass guitar.  Otis is essentially selling his sexual prowess to a woman in this song, bragging about how good he is in bed.  During the song he is aware that this woman is with another man, but he tells her that he is far superior, he is a man of action rather than one of words, and if this lady decides to go home with him, she will find this out for herself.  The chorus leaves little to the imagination with Redding talking about lighting this woman’s candle and then calling on the song title to insist he truly is “hard to handle.”  In summary, the narrator is telling us that he is a player and since he is not charging for love lessons, she needs to catch what he is throwing at her.

‘Hard to Handle’ was a mainstay of the Grateful Dead’s live set from 1969 to 1971, where it was sung by Ron “Pigpen” McKernan.  There is not all that much left to say about this song, unlike my usual posts, but I have some great videos for you to watch.

Baby here I am
I’m the man on the scene
I can give you what you want
But you gotta’ come home with me

I have got some good old lovin’
And I got some more in store
When I get through throwin’ it on
You gotta’ come back for more

Boys will come along a dime by the dozen
That ain’t nothing but ten cent lovin’
Pretty little thing, let me light your candle
‘Cause mama I’m sure hard to handle now, yessir’am

Action speaks louder than words
And I’m a man of great experience
I know you’ve got another man
But I can love you better than him

Take my hand don’t be afraid
I’m gonna prove every word I say
I’m advertising love for free
So you can place your ad with me

Boys will come along a dime by the dozen
That ain’t nothing but ten cent lovin’
Pretty little thing, let me light your candle
‘Cause mama I’m sure hard to handle now, yessir’am

Yeah
Hard to handle now
Oh baby

Baby here I am
I’m the man on the scene
I can give you what you want
But you gotta’ come home with me

I’ve got some good old lovin’
And I got some more in store
When I get through throwin’ it on you
You got to come a-runnin’ back for more

Boys will come along a dime by the dozen
That ain’t nothing but ten cent lovin’
Pretty little thing, let me light your candle
‘Cause mama I’m sure hard to handle now, yessir’am

Hard
Hard to handle now
Oh yeah, yeah yeah yeah

Boys will come along a dime by the dozen
That ain’t nothing but ten cent lovin’
Pretty little thing, let me light your candle
‘Cause mama I’m sure hard to handle now, yessir’am

Yeah
So hard to handle now
Oh yeah

Baby
Good lovin’
Baby, baby
Ohh, good lovin’
I need good lovin’
I got to have it, oh yeah
Yeah
So hard to handle, now, yeah

Written for Song Lyric Sunday where the prompt is Best/Better/Good/Great.

More

Humans started off being hunter-gatherers and then as they became more social, they formed stable societies, and musicians started entertaining others from the beginning of recorded history.  Musicians started by making naturally occurring sounds adding rhythms to represent the phenomena in their lives, using repetition patterns, banging on objects, and strumming devices to create music.  The first musician in the Bible was Jubal, the son of Lamech, and he is described as “the father of all who play the harp and flute or any stringed instrument”.  English is a great language, but some common adjectives form irregular comparatives and superlatives, like the word “good” forms better and best, not “gooder” and “goodest”.   These three words good, better, and best are examples of the three forms of an adjective or adverb being positive, comparative, and superlative.  St. Jerome once said, “Good, better, best.  Never let it rest.  ‘Til your good is better and your better is best.”

Last week we had Measured with a Thermometer and everyone was asked to find a song with a temperature related prompts of Cool/Freeze/Heat/Melt.  This week we have the delightful, lovely, magnificent, marvelous, splendid prompts of Best/Better/Good/Great and hopefully this will fit for everyone.  Take some time to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this music challenge, as you will probably find many enjoyable songs and it is quite possibly that you will learn a thing or two.  Share your music with others and post a video, try do some research and let everyone know something about the song that you post.  Show the lyrics, let’s all listen to our favorite songs and explore some new music.  Try to find a song that fits the prompt, then write your post and create a pingback, or you can just place your link in the comments section.

Here are the “rules”:
• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not.  If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post or place your link in the comments section below.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

I am writing about the Otis Redding song ‘Hard to Handle’ this week.  Next week I will be writing about the song ‘Spoonful’ by Willie Dixon.  The upcoming prompts will be:
July 12, 2020 – Air/Earth/Fire/Water
July 19, 2020 – Baking/Bread/Cake/Pie/Picnic
July 26, 2020 – Different/Same
August 2, 2020 – Acquire/Collect/Gather/Secure

Hot as a Pistol but Cool Inside

The Grateful Dead song ‘He’s Gone’ came out on their Europe ’72 album is a song about not crying over spilled milk.  The Grateful Dead realized that there was no need to express regret about something that has already happened or cannot be changed.  Like many others, when I first listened to this song, I thought it was about Pigpen, but further investigation revealed that I was wrong, as the Grateful Dead song ‘He’s Gone’ is about their money manager Lenny Hart who disappeared with their profits.  I guess this was their way of saying that they could make lemonade out of the lemons that they were handed.  People seemed to know that Ron “Pigpen” McKernan was going to die, even though he was still alive when this song was written, because of all the years of hard living and hard drinking that he did, and over time, the meaning of this song did change and it became an anthem for Pigpen.

Lenny Hart was a drummer who owned and operated Hart Music, selling drums and musical instruments in San Carlos, California.  He was the father of Mickey Hart, one of the percussionists for the Grateful Dead and he was also the Grateful Dead’s original money manager.  In late 1969, Garcia was invited to work on the soundtrack for Michelangelo Antonioni’s film Zabriskie Point, playing the guitar music for the “Love Scene” in the desert.  Lenny went to L.A. with Garcia to negotiate for music in Zabriskie Point movie, but Garcia never got paid for his work, since Lenny Hart stole the check from MGM.  In March, 1970, Lenny disappeared along with approximately US$155,000 of the group’s profits.  He was caught, arrested and convicted of criminal embezzlement and sentenced to six months in jail.

He promised to pay the group back cleaning out all the bank accounts, but the band didn’t even have any money to go on the road with.  As a result of the fiasco, Mickey Hart, feeling ashamed of his father’s actions, left the band in February 1971, not returning to the group on a full-time basis until 1974.  Lenny Hart died of natural causes on February 2, 1975 and Mickey went to the funeral home, took out the snakewood sticks that he had from when his dad left when he was still a child and played the traditional drum melody, ‘The Downfall of Paris’ that features a multiple bounce roll on Lenny’s coffin, and then he split.

Bill Graham the iconic concert promoter and he owned both The Fillmore and Winterland Arena, two of the Dead’s most played venues, helped to manage and promote the Grateful Dead in their early days before April of 1969 when Lenny Hart got the job.  In early March 1970, the band discovered he’d been stealing checks, keeping fake books, and squirreling away their money in his own secret bank accounts.  Lenny fled to Mexico in a hurry, taking the money with him and leaving the band broke.  Hunter wrote the line, “You know better, but I know him”, because he knew that Lenny Hart was ripping off the band and this was his way of saying “I told you so”.  Hunter knew that Lenny was a rat for stealing their money and he was caught on a limb, so he took off for Mexico.  After the departure of Lenny Hart, John McEntire took over as the group’s manager with Rock Scully doing the promotion, he guided the Grateful Dead through the era of Workingman’s Dead and American Beauty albums and into the 1980s.

The phrase “Cat on a tin roof” probably stems from the Tennessee Williams play, Cat on a Hot Tin Roof and it makes me think about the 1958 film Cat On A Hot Tin Roof staring Elizabeth Taylor, Paul Newman, and Burl Ives.  This song has a line in it that says “Nine mile skid on a ten mile ride, hot as a pistol but cool inside Cat on a tin roof, dogs in a pile Nothin’ left to do but smile, smile, smile.”  This song always makes me smile and the slogan “Smile, smile, smile” was used by William Howard Taft for his 1908 Presidential campaign who was known as the most jovial man in politics.  At one time many trains were propelled by steam and it is interesting to watch the steam coming out of the stack and then disappear out of sight and be gone like Lenny Hart.

The line “Steal your face right off your head” is probably the first occurrence of identity theft in rock music and it alludes to Lenny being able to gain the trust of others while doing all sorts of underhanded things.  The single most recognized image for the Grateful Dead, even more so than Garcia’s face, or his stubby finger, or the roses and dancing bears is probably the “Steal Your Face” logo that is commonly referred to as the “lightning skull”.  The concept was born out of necessity, as their longtime sound engineer (and noted LSD chemist) Owsley “Bear” Stanley needed an easily identifiable symbol for the band’s gear, so when they played concerts with other groups that their equipment was undoubtedly acknowledged when it was jammed in with other boxes and cases in backstage areas.  A spray paint-ready stencil was created with the help of Bob Thomas, a graphic designer that consisted of a circle with a clear delineation between one blue side and one red side, the lightning bolt and the skull.

Rat in a drain ditch, caught on a limb
You know better, but I know him

Like I told you, what I said
Steal your face right off your head

And now he’s gone
Now he’s gone, Lord he’s gone
He’s gone
Like a steam locomotive rolling down the track
He’s gone, gone, and nothing’s gonna bring him back
He’s gone

Nine mile skid on a ten mile ride
Hot as a pistol but cool inside

Cat on a tin roof, dogs in a pile
Nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile

Going where the wind don’t blow so strange
Maybe off on some high cold mountain range
Lost one round but the price wasn’t anything
A knife in the back and more of the same

Same old
Rat in a drain ditch, caught on a limb
You know better, but I know him

Like I told you, like I said
Steal your face right off your head

Ooh, nothing’s gonna bring him back
Ooh, nothing’s gonna bring him back
Ooh, nothing’s gonna bring him back

Written for Song Lyric Sunday where the prompt is Cool/Freeze/Heat/Melt.

Measured with a Thermometer

Water can exist as a solid (ice), liquid (water) or steam in its (vapor or gas) phase.  Adding heat can cause ice (a solid) to melt to form water (a liquid).  Removing heat causes water (a liquid) to freeze to form ice (a solid).  When water changes to a solid or a gas, it has changed to a different state of matter.  Even though the water’s physical form changes, its molecules stay the same.  When a substance goes from one state of matter solid, liquid, or gas to another state of matter, some rather interesting things occur.  Heat causes molecules to begin vibrating faster and faster and a solid will change to a liquid at it melting point and then a gas at its boiling point.

Last week we had Mary Poppins and everyone was asked to find a song using the prompt of either Maria/Marie/Mary.  This week we have temperature prompts of Cool/Freeze/Heat/Melt and hopefully this will fit for everyone.  Take some time to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this music challenge, as you will probably find many enjoyable songs and it is quite possibly that you will learn a thing or two.  Share your music with others and post a video, try do some research and let everyone know something about the song that you post.  Show the lyrics, let’s all listen to our favorite songs and explore some new music.  Try to find a song that fits the prompt, then write your post and create a pingback, or you can just place your link in the comments section.

Here are the “rules”:
• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not.  If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post or place your link in the comments section below.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

I am writing about the Grateful Dead song ‘He’s Gone’ this week.  Next week I will be writing about the song ‘Hard to Handle’ by Otis Redding.  The upcoming prompts will be:
July 5, 2020 – Best/Better/Good/Great
July 12, 2020 – Air/Earth/Fire/Water
July 19, 2020 – Baking/Bread/Cake/Pie/Picnic
July 26, 2020 – Different/Same

My Mother’s Name Was Mary

‘Mary’s A Grand Old Name’ was written by George M. Cohan for the 1906 three-act musical Forty-Five Minutes from Broadway.  This song has been saved in the Library of Congress and it also appeared in 1942 film Yankee Doodle Dandy, starring James Cagney.  George Cohan’s mother’s middle name was Mary and he had a daughter named Mary.  Cohan’s second wife was named Agnes Mary, but he was still married to his first wife, vaudeville star Ethel Levey, when he wrote the play Forty-five Minutes from Broadway.  The title of the play was written about the 45-minute train ride from New Rochelle to Broadway.  Yankee Doodle Dandy is a much-sanitized version of Cohan’s life that shows him with a sweetheart named Mary, played by Joan Leslie.

My mother’s name was Mary
She was so good and true
Because her name was Mary
She called me Mary, too
She wasn’t gay or airy
But plain as she could be
I hate to meet a fairy
Who calls herself Marie

For it is Mary, Mary
Plain as any name can be
But with propriety, society will say Marie
But it was Mary, Mary
Long before the fashions came
And there is something there that sounds so square
It’s a grand old name

Now, when her name is Mary
There is no falseness there
When to Marie she’ll vary
She’ll surely bleach her hair
Though Mary’s ordinary
Marie is fair to see
Don’t ever fear sweet Mary
Beware of sweet Marie

For it is Mary, Mary
Plain as any name can be
But with propriety, society will say Marie
But it was Mary, Mary
Long before the fashions came
And there is something there that sounds so square
It’s a grand old name

Written for Song Lyric Sunday where the prompt is Maria/Marie/Mary.

Mary Poppins

In the New Testament, the virgin Mary is the mother of Jesus.  When I was working in Brazil, I went to see the movie There’s Something About Mary with Ben Stiller and Cameron Diaz which was in English with Portuguese subtitles.  Mary is a variant of the Hebrew name Miriam, who was the sister of Moses.  Marie is the French form of Mary, directly derived from Latin Maria.  Julie Andrews plays the role of Maria in the Sound of Music.  Let’s not forget Mary Queen of Scots, Mary Shelley and Mary Mallon who became known as Typhoid Mary.  Lisa Marie married Elvis Presley and Maria Shriver was married to Arnold Schwarzenegger.  When Columbus discovered the New World, his flagship was the Santa Maria.

Last week we had My Brother’s Name is Jack where everyone was asked to find a song using the prompt of either Jack/John.  This week we have feminine name prompts of Maria/Marie/Mary and hopefully this will fit for everyone.  Take some time to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this music challenge, as you will probably find many enjoyable songs and it is quite possibly that you will learn a thing or two.  Share your music with others and post a video, try do some research and let everyone know something about the song that you post.  Show the lyrics, let’s all listen to our favorite songs and explore some new music.  Try to find a song that fits the prompt, then write your post and create a pingback, or you can just place your link in the comments section.

Here are the “rules”:
• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not.  If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post or place your link in the comments section below.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

I am writing about the George M. Cohan song ‘Mary’s A Grand Old Name’ this week.  Next week I will be writing about the song ‘He’s Gone’ by the Grateful Dead.  The upcoming prompts will be:
June 28, 2020 – Cool/Freeze/Heat/Melt
July 5, 2020 – Best/Better/Good/Great
July 12, 2020 – Air/Earth/Fire/Water
July 19, 2020 – Baking/Bread/Cake/Pie/Picnic

Slip Out the Back, Jack

‘50 Ways to Leave Your Lover’ was a single by Paul Simon from his fourth studio album Still Crazy After All These Years released in 1975.  This became Simon’s sole #1 hit as a solo artist on the Billboard Hot 100 which went to #23 in the UK and the album won Album of the Year at the Grammys.  Simon split with Art Garfunkel five years earlier and the lyrics for this song came to him as he awoke one morning while he was in his Central Park apartment.  Paul Simon was married three times and he married his first wife Peggy Harper in 1969, with whom he has a son.  This breakup with Peggy came within days of the Jan 13 announcement that his previous album There Goes Rhymin’ Simon was nominated for a Grammy in the best album category, which he eventually lost to Stevie Wonder’s Innervisions.

Simon married his manager’s ex-wife Harper in 1969.  Five years later, after she kept interrupting his attempt to listen to the new Stevie Wonder album, he walked out and moved into a hotel.  Their divorce soon followed.  Simon did say that this song wasn’t about his wife, but it clearly represents the feelings of someone who feels trapped in bad relationship.  Simon’s younger brother Eddie, said that Paul made this song up while teaching his son how to rhyme.  Paul only gives us 5 ways in the song how one could leave their lover, using Jack, Stan, Roy, Gus and Lee, so clearly, he still owes us another 45 ways.

I could probably finish this song with a few more verses about, “Go for a swim Jim, Use your head Fred, Try again Ben, Find another babe Gabe, Kick her to the curb Herb, try being a dick Nick, you could be more lax Max, Send her a cable Abel, you may have to be crude Jude, Get out of bed Ed, Start being mean Dean, You could become a skeeve Steve, Use your brain Zane, Try not to be so sweet Pete, You could use your smile Kyle, Start lying Brian, Give it your all Paul, There is no need to be fake Jake, Stop being a good boy Troy and things of this nature.  If you have a line that you think fits in, then let me know.

“The problem is all inside your head”, she said to me
“The answer is easy if you take it logically
I’d like to help you in your struggle to be free
There must be fifty ways to leave your lover”
She said, “it’s really not my habit to intrude
Furthermore, I hope my meaning won’t be lost or misconstrued
But I’ll repeat myself at the risk of being crude
There must be fifty ways to leave your lover
Fifty ways to leave your lover”
You just slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don’t need to be coy, Roy
Just get yourself free
Hop on the bus, Gus
You don’t need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free
Ooh, slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don’t need to be coy, Roy
You just listen to me
Hop on the bus, Gus
You don’t need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free
She said, “it grieves me so to see you in such pain
I wish there was something I could do to make you smile again”
I said, “I appreciate that and would you please explain
About the fifty ways”
She said, “why don’t we both just sleep on it tonight?
And I believe in the morning you’ll begin to see the light”
And then she kissed me and I realized she probably was right
There must be fifty ways to leave your lover
Fifty ways to leave your lover
You just slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don’t need to be coy, Roy
Just get yourself free
Oh, you hop on the bus, Gus
You don’t need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free
Slip out the back, Jack
Make a new plan, Stan
You don’t need to be coy, Roy
You just listen to me
Hop on the bus, Gus
You don’t need to discuss much
Just drop off the key, Lee
And get yourself free

Written for Song Lyric Sunday where the prompt is Jack/John.

My Brother’s Name is Jack

Jack Black, Jack Daniels, Jack Frost, Jack Reacher and Jack Ruby all went up the hill to get some water.  “Back off Jack”, said Little Jack Horner as he was playing jumping jacks.  Jack Schitt was playing blackjack and he hit the jackpot, so now he could finally build that house that he always wanted.  “Here’s Johnny”, is what Ed McMahon said on The Tonight Show to introduce Johnny Carson, but this phrase could also refer to the scene in The Shining where Jack Torrance a deranged writer played by Jack Nicholson peers through a hole in a door that he has just created with an axe.

Last week we had Mutt and Jeff where everyone was asked to find a song with a height or a size prompt using either Big/Large/Little/Small/Tall/Tiny.  This week we have the name prompts of Jack/John and hopefully this will fit everyone.  Take some time to read the posts of other bloggers who respond to this music challenge, as you will probably find many enjoyable songs and it is quite possibly that you will learn a thing or two.  Share your music with others and post a video, try do some research and let everyone know something about the song that you post.  Show the lyrics, let’s all listen to our favorite songs and explore some new music.  Try to find a song that fits the prompt, then write your post and create a pingback, or you can just place your link in the comments section.

Here are the “rules”:
• Post the lyrics to the song of your choice, whether it fits the theme or not. If it does not fit, then please explain why you chose this song.
• Please try to include the songwriter(s) – it’s a good idea to give credit where credit is due.
• Make sure you also credit the singer/band and if you desire you can provide a link to where you found the lyrics.
• Link to the YouTube video, or pull it into your post so others can listen to the song.
• Ping back to this post or place your link in the comments section below.
• Read at least one other person’s blog, so we can all share new and fantastic music and create amazing new blogging friends in the process.
• Feel free to suggest future prompts.
• Have fun and enjoy the music.

I am writing about the Paul Simon song ‘50 Ways to Leave Your Lover’ this week.  Next week I will be writing about the song ‘Mary’s A Grand Old Name’ by George M. Cohan.  The upcoming prompts will be:
June 21, 2020 – Maria/Marie/Mary
June 28, 2020 – Cool/Freeze/Heat/Melt
July 5, 2020 – Best/Better/Good/Great
July 12, 2020 – Air/Earth/Fire/Water