The Damage Done

‘The Needle and the Damage Done’ was written by Neil Young in 1971 and it came out on his Harvest album which was released in February of 1972 and this song charted #75 in the UK.  The song was written before his bandmate Danny Whitten and roadie Bruce Berry both died, but Neil wrote this to try to bring awareness to heroin which at the time was misunderstood, but Neil knew that it was a very dangerous drug.  Whitten died later in November of 1972 and Bruce died in June of 1973.  Bruce was a professional roadie for the members of Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young, both as a group and individually.  His brother was Jan Berry of Jan and Dean, and his father worked with Howard Hughes on the Spruce Goose.  Harvest is the only Young album to hit #1 on the Billboard 200 chart.

The group Crazy Horse started out in 1969 and continues to the present day, they have been co-credited on a number of Young’s albums.  Neil ran across a band called the Rockets after he left Buffalo Springfield.  This group was led by guitarist Danny Whitten, they were a former doo-wop group that had morphed into a psychedelic folk outfit.  They weren’t highly trained musicians, but they played with incredible intensity.  Success had eluded them for years, and they jumped at the chance to play with someone as established as Neil Young, who promptly changed their name to Crazy Horse after the Oglala Sioux Indian chief who fought against the removal of his tribe to a reservation in the Black Hills.

Frankie Lyman of the Teenagers died from heroin, followed by Janis Joplin on October 4, 1970, and Jim Morrison’s 1971 heart attack was thought to have been triggered by an overdose of heroin.  The cause of death listed for Danny Whitten of Crazy Horse was Valium and alcohol overdose.  One day Whitten was so high on heroin that he couldn’t even hold up his guitar, so Young fired him, gave him some money and a plane ticket back to Los Angeles.  The Velvet Underground had a song ‘Heroin’ on their 1967 debut album written by Lou Reed, which discusses heroin use and abuse.  The James Taylor song ‘Fire and Rain’ came out on his second album in August 1970 and this was a reaction to the suicide of his childhood friend Suzanne Schnare, and his own struggles with a heroin addiction that began when he was 18.

Heroin addicts were known to sell their blood for money, and then use that money to buy their next fix.  Heroin is a disgusting drug, especially when it is injected and not snorted.  In my wilder days, I was at this party snorting coke when I watched a guy who just shot up heroin and the needle got stuck in his arm.  I felt like I was going to puke from looking at him while he was crying out for help, but I left the room and some other junkie eventually helped him.

Milk-blood refers to a heroin shot where some heroin users fill a syringe with a heroin mixture that has a white (“milk”) color.  Then they stick the needle of the syringe in a vein and pull the plunger to check if they are inside the vein.  If so, blood is sucked into the syringe.  They then push the plunger to inject the heroin-blood mixture into the vein.  The phrase “Milk blood” in this song most likely refers to the act of extracting heroin-laden blood, for reinjection at a later time.  There is no way to stop the sun from setting, as once it starts going down, it is inevitable that darkness will follow.  This may be why Neil wrote, “every junkie’s like a settin’ sun”, because when you start fooling around with this drug, there is a good chance that it will end up killing you.

I caught you knockin’ at my cellar door
I love you, baby, can I have some more?
Ooh, ooh, the damage done

I hit the city and I lost my band
I watched the needle take another man
Gone, gone, the damage done

I sing the song because I love the man
I know that some of you don’t understand
Milk blood to keep from running out

I’ve seen the needle and the damage done
A little part of it in everyone
But every junkie’s like a settin’ sun

Written for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Music Challenge #184 – LSD-25.

LSD-25 – Challenge #184

Someone had to be first to write a song with an LSD reference in it, but an instrumental can be named anything. ‘LSD-25’ is an early surf rock smoldering instrumental which could be compared to something done by Link Wray. The Gamblers only recorded one more single before they disbanded, but they made history with this song.

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In 1960, the Gamblers recorded ‘LSD-25’, which was the first rock surf music song ever to pay tribute to a hallucinogen.  This song has an interesting history mostly because this band was so obscure and shrouded in mystery that not one photo exists of them.  There are some timeless records (those that set a trend which tends to followed for years if not decades after the recording) where you can look back at retrospectively and see that while they seemed unimportant at the time, they signaled a huge change in the musical culture.  This Gamblers single ‘Moon Dawg’, backed by ‘LSD-25’ is one of them.  Most of their music consists of two guitarists, bass, drums, and keyboards, but people have said that up to fifteen people have been credited as having been members of the group.

Since you can’t believe everything that you read on the internet, I decided to do…

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With Love We Sleep

‘Because the Night’ was written by Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith and first released in 1978 as a single from the Patti Smith Group 1978 album, Easter, and it charted #5 in the UK for her and reached #13 it the US.  It’s the only song that Patti Smith and Bruce Springsteen ever wrote together, and it’s her first hit, and her only hit.  Patti had a large cult following and she was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 2007, but this song was an anomaly in her discography, which was aimed at a far narrower audience.  Smith was always trying to shake things up and the birth of what would come to be known as punk, the raw, revolutionary music that challenged rock’s complacency, is often traced to Smith and a handful of other pioneers.

Jimmy Iovine, who produced Patti’s album, encouraged Bruce to write a song for her.  The music for ‘Because the Night’ was written by Springsteen, but he didn’t include it on his 1978 Darkness On The Edge Of Town album, because he felt that it didn’t fit the theme, which was about stripping away everything.  Bruce had the structure, with words for the chorus, but no lyrics were written for the verse.  Jimmy took a cassette tape of the track with Bruce on the chorus, and gave it to Patti, because Bruce knew this was a love song and he wasn’t interested in writing one at this time.  Bruce said that this song may never have never seen the light of day without Patti’s contribution.  It stayed in limbo till Patti finally got around to writing the verses.  Patti was beloved, although she was completely an underground artist who was able to emerge on the power of this song, and Bruce has always has been grateful for that.

Most women change their last name when they get married, but Patti Smith didn’t have to when she married Fred “Sonic” Smith who was one of the key architects of the Detroit High Energy rock sound as guitarist and co-founder of the legendary MC5.  They were married from 1980 through 1994 and around this time Fred lived in Michigan while Patti was in New York.  They relied on phone calls to stay in touch with each other, but they were both poor and because long distance calls were expensive, they tried to limit their talks to about once a week, and these were always made at night, when the rates were cheaper.  One night, Patti was expecting his call at 7:30, but it didn’t come, so Patti started listening to this song for the first time while waiting for the call.  Patti was getting agitated and antsy, because of this waiting, and she hoped working on this song would be a distraction from aggravation she felt having to wait for this call, and she came up with, “Have I doubt when I’m alone, love is a ring, the telephone.”

Patti wrote these rather specific lyrics about her yearning for love in the night, wanting to be taken and pulled closer and touched by her lover.  Patti said that she always wanted to write a song that everyone could love.  That’s the one thing that she felt she wanted to achieve by writing this song.  It is the kind of song that when you hear it, everybody seems happy.  Patti said that she wrote poetry for herself or for the gods of poetry, but she felt that a song should be written for the people.

Smith grew up in New Jersey, she was an outcast in High School, but enjoyed writing poetry and later she wrote articles for Rolling Stone and Creem magazine, published two volumes of her poems, and contributed lyrics for Blue Öyster Cult.  Clive Davis signed her to a contract with Arista Records, and she released her first album, Horses, in 1975.  Her follow-up LP, Radio Ethiopia was a financial flop and during the tour to support it in Tampa, Florida on January 23, 1977, Smith twirled herself right off the stage, breaking two vertebrae in her neck and she was forced to spent the following year wearing a neck brace and undergoing physical therapy.

Take me now, baby, here as I am
Pull me close, try and understand
Desire is hunger is the fire I breathe
Love is a banquet on which we feed

Come on now, try and understand
The way I feel when I’m in your hands
Take my hand, come undercover
They can’t hurt you now
Can’t hurt you now, can’t hurt you now

Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to lust
Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to us

Have I doubt when I’m alone
Love is a ring, the telephone
Love is an angel disguised as lust
Here in our bed until the morning comes

Come on now, try and understand
The way I feel under your command
Take my hand as the sun descends
They can’t touch you now
Can’t touch you now, can’t touch you now

Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to lust
Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to us

With love we sleep
With doubt the vicious circle
Turns and burns
Without you, oh, I cannot live
Forgive, the yearning burning
I believe it’s time, too real to feel

So touch me now, touch me now, touch me now

Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to lust
Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to us

Because tonight there are two lovers
If we believe in the night we trust
Because the night belongs to lovers
Because the night belongs to lust

Because the night
Belongs to lovers
Because the night
Belongs to us
‘Cause we believe tonight we’re lovers
‘Cause we believe, in the night we trust
Because the night belongs to lovers

Written for MM Music prompt Because – Challenge #183.

Because – Challenge #183

The Dave Clark Five faded into obscurity, but in their time, they were famous enough to have a Top Ten hit ‘Glad All Over’ which knocked the Beatles’ ‘I Want to Hold Your Hand’ off the top of the UK Singles Chart. They were the second group of the British Invasion to appear on The Ed Sullivan Show, and that happened within one month of the Beatles’ initial appearance. They appeared 18 times on Ed Sullivan’s show and they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. The DC5 as they were called spent more time in America during 1965 to 1967 than in their homeland, as it seemed like America couldn’t get enough of them. This group was formed in 1958 and they stayed together till 1970, when they disbanded.

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In the late Fifties, Dave Clark and a group of four mates from the north London area formed a band called The Dave Clark Five.  Clark was the leader of this group, as well as the drummer and he saw the band as a business enterprise, so he made sure that every one of his fellow band members were paid a weekly salary.  By 1959, the group was comprised of Dave Clark (drums), Stan Saxon (vocals), Mick Ryan (lead guitar), Rick Huxley (guitar), Chris Walls (bass) and Jim Spencer (sax).  They built a great reputation as covers band, but Clark wanted more.  The lead guitarist Mick Ryan had a brother named Ron Ryan, who became a very good friend of Clark’s, and they discussed what the band needed to get them off the ground was to have its own original material.  When Clark asked where new material could be found…

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Cried the Whole Night Long

The song ‘Tore Up Over You’ was written by Hank Ballard and was first released by The Midnighters in 1956.  Hank Ballard was born John Henry Kendricks and he was an American R&B singer and songwriter, the lead vocalist of The Midnighters and one of the first rock and roll artists to emerge in the early 1950s.  Ballard is best remembered for songs that were frequently as scandalous as they were inventive, most notably the salacious like ‘Work with Me Annie’.  He also wrote ‘The Twist’, which sparked a dance craze in the United States.  He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

‘Tore Up Over You’ was performed over 230 times by the Legion of Mary and the Jerry Garcia Band between 1975 and 1995.  This song was on Jerry Garcia’s third solo album Reflections, which was released in 1976.  The band members to play along with Garcia on the album cut of this song were Nicky Hopkins on piano, Larry Knechtel on Fender Rhodes, John Kahn on bass, Ron Tutt on drums and Donna Jean Godchaux sang background vocals.  Partway through the production of the album Reflections, Garcia stopped recording with his solo band and brought in the members of the Grateful Dead to be on five songs, so it ended up being half of the Jerry Garcia Band and half of the Grateful Dead.

This is a song of lost love, where the girl left and the guy is torn up over that and he ends up crying the whole night long.  He complains that she didn’t love him like she said she would, because if she did, she never would have left him and went with somebody else.  He world like her to tell him what he can do to make her come back and stay with him, because without her, he can’t seem to find his way.

Ever since you been gone

I just cried the whole night long
Since the day you said goodbye

Left me sore, no lie, no lie

Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.
Tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Whoa-oh-oh tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.

Never loved me like ya told me so if you did how could you go?
It was you, not me, that left and went away with someone else

Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.
Tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Whoa-oh-oh tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.

Tell me what can I do to make you come back and stay?

Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.
Tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Whoa-oh-oh tore up! Yeah, yeah, yeah, tore up.
Tore up over you, and I just can’t find my way.

Written for MM Music Challenge #182 Bloody Well Right.

Bloody Well Right – Challenge #182

Supertramp was formed in 1969 by pianist and vocalist Rick Davies. Davies was in a group called the Joint, but he became disenchanted with them, so Davies started a new band by placing an ad in the British music weekly Melody Maker, and recruited guitarist Richard Palmer, percussionist Robert Millar, and vocalist/bassist Roger Hodgson. Davies initially dubbed the new band Daddy, but to avoid comparison with a number of other paternally named acts, he changed their billing to Supertramp, taking the name from the 1908 memoir “The Autobiography of a Super-Tramp”, by Welsh author William Henry Davies. Rick Davies was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in 2015, but by 2018 Davies had largely overcome his health problems. Supertramp has been snubbed by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.
Roger Hodgson, the legendary co-founder of Supertramp wrote many of their classic hits and he was the driving force behind what fans call the 14 golden years of the band. Hodgson wrote ‘Dreamer’, ‘Breakfast in America’, ‘Give a Little Bit’, ‘The Logical Song’, ‘Take The Long Way Home’, ‘It’s Raining Again’, and many more. He wrote, sang, and arranged the enduring rock standards that made Supertramp a worldwide phenomenon with album sales in excess of 60 million. Roger Hodgson left the band in 1983 and the Supertramp that most people know has not existed for over 30 years. The music of Supertramp totally changed after Roger left to match Rick Davies’s musical influence, which is more jazz and blues. Hodgson moved his family away from the Los Angeles music scene to live a simpler lifestyle close to nature and be home with his children as they were growing up.

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‘Bloody Well Right’ was written by Rick Davies and Roger Hodgson and this song became Supertramp’s first charting hit in the US reaching #35 on the charts.  It was recorded on their Crime Of The Century 1974 album.  Supertramp was a progressive rock band that formed in London in 1970, but ‘Bloody Well Right’ failed to chart in the UK, and it is thought that the British were offended by the adjective “bloody” in the title, as it has been considered to be a swear word over there since at least 1676.  These days it is considered a mild expletive at best all around the world, but a few years back, it was only used by people who were thought to be in the lower class, and anyone respectable considered it to be a horrid word.  Some people referred to this as a concept album. but Roger Hodgson said that other…

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No Crazier Than You

Only You Know and I Know was Dave Mason’s first charting single which he recorded in 1970 on his debut solo album, Alone Together and this single reached #42 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart.  The song received a good deal of album-oriented rock radio airplay and was a major commercial success with the album getting to #22 on the Billboard album chart, the highest placement among Mason’s 14 albums to make that chart between 1970-76.  In 1970, Mason was 7,000 miles from his first home.  He was still new to America, and found himself working in one of Hollywood’s iconic studios, in a room full of session players who were learning his songs for the first time.  The whole experience was unfamiliar, and it shows at times.  Dave Mason performed with a roster of guest musicians, including Delaney and Bonnie Bramlett, Leon Russell, Jim Capaldi, Rita Coolidge, Carl Radle and Jim Gordon.  Billboard Magazine (1970) wrote, “Mason with help from friends Jim Capaldi and Leon Russell proves his mastery of the rock idiom once and for all.  The lyric content and music content of every song catches the senses of the listener and creates excitement.”  Bill Shapiro of the Rock and Roll Review (1991) says, Mason’s “reputation as a composer, guitarist, and singer of the first rank is both merited and in evidence here.”

Dave Mason re-released this album last year, fifty years after it was first recorded, because he said that he was never quite satisfied with how his vocals sounded.  He liked the songs, but he was so young and it being his first solo album, the older he got, the more the vocals bothered him.  He wanted to record them again the way that he first imagined them when he wrote them.  Mason said that this is a more accurate representation of what he thinks he sounds like, and the songs all gained a new depth because of this.  50 years later, Mason said that he is truly satisfied with all of these songs.  This song appears to be a conversation that Mason is having with his girlfriend.  They are in a good relationship and there no reason for either of them to doubt it.  He doesn’t want her to read too much into a recent argument they had, and he tells her to stay with him.  She likes getting her own way, but he tells her that she can’t have that all the time.  As they are a couple in this together, they need to work as a team to please each other.  He knows that she will have trouble believing this when she feels like she has been mistreated.  He admits to having done some crazy things, but he tells her that she has also been crazy at times.

Only you know and I know
All the lovin’ we’ve got to show
So don’t refuse to believe it
By reading too many meanin’s

‘Cause you know that I mean what I say so don’t go
And never take me the wrong way
You know you can’t go on gettin’ your own way
‘Cause if you do, it’s gonna get you someday, yeah

We’re both here to be pleasin’
Oh no no, not deceivin’
But it’s hard to believe in, aw yeah
When you’ve been so mistreated

‘Cause you know that I mean what I say so don’t go
And never take me the wrong way
You know you can’t go on gettin’ your own way
‘Cause if you do, it’s gonna get you someday

If I seem to mislead you
It’s just my craziness comin’ through
But when it comes down to just two
Aw, I ain’t no crazier than you

‘Cause you know that I mean what I say so don’t go
And never take me the wrong way
You know you can’t go on gettin’ your own way
‘Cause if you do, it’s gonna get you someday

Only you know and I know
Only you know and I know
Only you know and I know, oh yeah
Only you know and I know, oh yeah, get up

Written for MM Music Challenge #181 We Just Disagree.

We Just Disagree – Challenge #181

Dave Mason has had a long career producing, performing, and writing songs. He was a professional musician in his teens, being a member of the instrumental group the Jaguars, and he made his recording debut on a locally released single, ‘Opus to Spring’, in 1963. While in this group he met drummer Jim Capaldi, and the two became members of the Hellions, playing together in 1964 and 1965. Mason quit the Hellions in the spring of 1965 to study music formally, but he sat in occasionally with another band Deep Feeling that featured Capaldi. In early 1966, he took a job as road manager for the Spencer Davis Group, where he encountered Steve Winwood; various reports suggest he also played with the band on-stage and he may have sung backup vocals on the hit ‘Somebody Help Me’. In March 1967, Winwood left the Spencer Davis Group and formed Traffic with Mason, Capaldi, and flautist Chris Wood.

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Dave Mason recorded ‘We Just Disagree’ on his 1977 Let It Flow album and the single went to #12 in the US becoming Mason’s biggest hit as a solo artist.  This song was written by Jim Krueger, a guitarist from Manitowoc, Wisconsin who joined Dave Mason’s band in 1974.  Krueger became Mason’s trusted musical partner at a time when he sorely needed the help and this ballad featured Krueger’s 12-string guitar prominently along with him also singing the harmony above Mason’s lead vocal.  Mason was a former member of the band Traffic one of the greatly respected bands in the late sixties, signed a deal with Columbia Records in 1973 that demanded two albums a year from him.  It was Clive Davis who signed Mason, but Davis departed the label soon after, leaving Mason in the lurch.

Mason wrote ‘Feelin’ Alright’ for Traffic and it became a big hit for…

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I Like Bread

‘Bread And Butter’ by The Newbeats was released in 1964 on their Bread & Butter / Big Beat Sounds album and the single reached to #2 in the U.S, and went to #15 in the UK charts.  It was kept from reaching the #1 spot by both, ‘The House of the Rising Sun’ by The Animals and ‘Oh, Pretty Woman’ by Roy Orbison.  It was written by Larry Parks and Jay Turnbow, and it became the group’s first and most popular hit.  It features the lead falsetto singing of Larry Henley and a memorable two-chord piano riff.  The group used this as a demo for Hickory Records, and then recorded it for the label.  The Newbeats formed in Shreveport, Louisiana, in 1964 and the trio consisted of Larry Henley, and brothers Dean Mathis, and Mark Mathis.  The Mathis brothers previously performed as the duo Dean & Mark, notching a minor hit in 1959 with the single ‘Tell Him No’.

The Newbeats had three other Top 40 charting singles in the Billboard Hot 100 which includes, ‘Everything’s Alright’ (#16, 1964), ‘Break Away (From That Boy)’ (#40, 1965) and ‘Run Baby Run (Back Into My Arms’ (#12, 1965).  They also had some success with ‘Don’t Turn Me Loose’ and ‘Crying My Heart Out Over You’.  The Newbeats appeared on the TV music variety shows Shindig! (1964), American Bandstand (1964) and Where the Action Is (1965) at the height of their mid-‘60s heyday and they toured in a package show with the Stones, Roy Orbison and Ray Columbus and the Invaders, and they dissolved in 1974.

Jay Turnbow was in a band called the Ivy Jives, and Larry Parks was a drummer who toured with Roy Orbison.  The pair wrote some songs together and submitted them to the music publishing company Acuff-Rose.  The pair also co-wrote (along with Bob Finnicum), a few other Newbeats songs, including ‘(The Bees Are For The Birds) The Birds Are For The Bees’ and ‘Hey-O-Daddy-O’. Larry Henley was a co-songwriter of ‘The Wind Beneath My Wing’, which was recorded by Bette Midler for the soundtrack to the film Beaches.  Larry also wrote ‘Till I Get It Right’, which was a top country hit for Tammy Wynette, and he penned songs for Kenny Rogers, and inked up ‘Lizzie and the Rainman’ which Tanya Tucker had a hit with and was later covered by the Hollies.

The phrase “bread and butter” comes from an old folk superstition.  It is typically said by young couples or friends walking together usually used in fun, when they are forced to separate by an obstacle, such as a pole or another person.  By saying the phrase, the bad luck of letting something come between them is thought to be averted.  It’s variously used as a kind of “knock on wood” charm to ward off bad luck between two people.  Bread and butter may refer to the source that one depends on for their income or livelihood, the item or process that provides one’s sustenance and lifestyle.  Bread and butter is sometimes used to mean something ordinary, something that would be an everyday occurrence.

I like bread and butter,
I like toast and jam,
That’s what my baby feeds me,
I’m her loving man.

He likes bread and butter,
He likes toast and jam,
That’s what his baby feeds him,
He’s her loving man.

She don’t cook mashed potatoes,
She don’t cook T-bone steaks,
Don’t feed me peanut butter,
She knows that I can’t take.

He likes bread and butter,
He likes toast and jam,
That’s what his baby feeds him,
He’s her loving man.

Got home early one morning,
Much to my surprise,
She was eating chicken and dumplings
With some other guy.

No more bread and butter,
No more toast and jam,
I found my baby eating
With some other man.

Written for MM Music Challenge #180 Make It With You.

Make It With You – Challenge #180

David Gates was born on December 11, 1940 and he grew up in Tulsa, Oklahoma playing in bar bands with future Wrecking Crew standout Leon Russell. Like Russell, Gates moved to Los Angeles in the early ’60s, becoming a studio musician and occasional songwriter. David wrote ‘Popsicles And Icicles’, a hit in Australia for the girl group the Murmaids, which was ranked #31 on Cash Box’s Top 100 Chart Hits of 1964. David worked regularly as a session musician, playing on demos for Jackie DeShannon and Randy Newman, and Johnny Burnett recorded ‘Sweet Suzie’ which David wrote, although it wasn’t a hit. In 1966, Gates produced some early singles by Captain Beefheart and he also wrote ‘Saturday’s Child’ for the Monkees which was recorded on their debut album.
In 1968, his friend Leon Russell recommended that David produce an album for Griffin and Royer, who had formed a duo called Pleasure Faire. Griffin was from Memphis, and learned classical guitar before taking up rock and roll in high school. Royer played several instruments, but was studying drama in college when he joined Pleasure Faire. In 1968, Pleasure Faire evolved into Bread and after they signed with Elektra, they released a not-that-successful debut album a year later. The three original members of this soft-rock band were David Gates, James Griffin and Robb Royer.
After their first LP failed to rise above number 100 on Billboard’s album chart, Mike Botts joined to make Bread a quartet. In 1970, Griffin and Royer wrote ‘For All We Know’, for the film Lovers and other Strangers, under the assumed names of Arthur James and Robb Wilson. The song won an Oscar and was recorded by the Carpenters. In July-August 1970, the Carpenters had the #1 record in America with ‘(They Long To Be) Close To You’, and Bread took over this top spot with ‘Make It With You’.
Only their softer songs such as ‘If’, ‘Baby I’m-A Want You’ and ‘Everything I Own’ were able to reach the upper portion of the Hot 100. The line-up shifted in 1971 when Royer left to write screenplays. He was replaced by ace session musician Larry Knechtel, and by 1973, Bread had grown stale and the four members mutually decided to disband. Gates recorded several solo albums and had his biggest hit with the title tune for Neil Simon’s The Goodbye Girl. Griffin recorded a solo album for Polydor and Knechtel went back to session work. Bread was inducted into the Vocal Group Hall of Fame in 2006.

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‘Make It With You’ was the first hit for the pop-rock group Bread. It was released on their second album On The Waters in 1970. This album peaked at #12 on theBillboardHot 200 and remained on the charts for 32 weeks. This song was written by the lead singer andprimary songwriter David Gates, and itcharted #5 in the UK and went to#1in the US. This wasn’t exactly a group effort in the studio, as the only two members of the band to appear on the track were the drummer Mike Botts, and Gates who sang both lead and harmony vocals, played acoustic guitar, electric guitar, bass, and strings. ‘Make It With You’ topped the charts on the week of August 22, 1970. It was the group’s only #1 hit, but it confirmed that they had made it, well they definitely conquered the pop charts with this one.

There is a…

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