Baby It’s Cold Outside

Cold is determined by the lack of molecular movement.  Cold is a relatively low or extremely low temperature, especially when compared to the temperature of the human body, and it is a condition that is the opposite of hot, much less than warm or normal.  Something that is icy, chilly, cool, frigid or frosty would be cold.

At the end of last year the tune ‘Baby It’s Cold Outside’ was seen as being sexist and some radio stations banned it from their play lists, as a long-simmering debate over the lyrics reached a boil.  There is actually no problem with the 1944 Frank Loesser song, it is the scene in the movie Neptune’s Daughter that people have taken an issue with.  Some skeptics felt the lyrics sounded like a prelude to date rape.  The woman keeps protesting, “I ought to say no, no, no, sir,” as he asks to move in closer.  “My sister will be suspicious”, she sings.  “Gosh, your lips look delicious”, he answers.  She wonders aloud what is in her drink.

Some things in this age of political correctness, just don’t make sense any more. Is this flirtatious banter between two consenting adults which may lead to love and romance, or is it a woman who is genuinely resisting a man’s advances and a man who refuses to take “no” for an answer?  Since you are not supposed to judge a book by its cover, then you should also not judge a song by its movie.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – January 23 prompt.

Some Questions Never Get Answered

I have been waiting my whole life to find out how much is that doggie in the window, but I am not thinking about purchasing it.  I guess this one will end up going to the grave with me.

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

I must take a trip to California
And leave my poor sweetheart alone
If he has a dog, he won’t be lonesome
And the doggie will have a good home

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

I read in the papers there are robbers
With flashlights that shine in the dark
My love needs a doggie to protect him
And scare them away with one bark

I don’t want a bunny or a kitty
I don’t want a parrot that talks
I don’t want a bowl of little fishies
He can’t take a goldfish for a walk

How much is that doggie in the window?
The one with the waggly tail
How much is that doggie in the window?
I do hope that doggie’s for sale

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – January 16 prompt which is “Dedication”.

I Feel The Earth Move

At the equator, the Earth is spinning at 1000 miles per hour about its axis and moving at 67,000 miles per hour around the Sun.  We don’t feel anything because all of the motions are almost completely constant.  The Earth’s spin carries us around in a very big circle, and it takes a long time to go around.  The spinning Earth is flinging us away from its surface a tiny bit, so that we weigh a little less than we would otherwise, simply because we are not being held down to the surface as tightly.

No this post is not about an earthquake or an avalanche, it is the song written by Carole King and James Taylor which charted #1 in the US from King’s 1971 Tapestry album.  Carole King was inducted into the Songwriters’ Hall of Fame in 1987 and into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1990.

I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down
I feel my heart start to trembling
Whenever you’re around

Ooh, baby, when I see your face
Mellow as the month of May
Oh, darling, I can’t stand it
When you look at me that way

I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down
I feel my heart start to trembling
Whenever you’re around

Ooo, darling, when you’re near me
And you tenderly call my name
I know that my emotions
Are something I just can’t tame
I’ve just got to have you, baby, uh huh huh uh huh huh yeah

I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down
I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down
I just lose control
Down to…

I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down
I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down
I just lose control
Down to my very soul
I get hot and cold, all over, all over, all over, all over
I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down
I feel the earth move under my feet
I feel the sky tumbling down, a’tumbling down,
A’tumbling down, a’tumbling down, a’tumbling down, a’tumbling down, tumbling down!

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – January 9 prompt which is “the side of her recycling box”.

Location, Location

I heard that the average person living in Venezuela lost 23 pounds last year, and although I would really like to drop a few pounds, there is no way that I am moving there. All this weight loss is attributed to starvation and I would rather be fat, than be hungry or starving.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – January 2 prompt which is “Alex is back home”.

Come Hell Or High Water

This phrase is believed to have started in America in the late 1800s, or perhaps the early 1900s, and it was derived from cattle herders who traveled from Texas to the Midwest, forging deep rivers and crossing large prairies in the summer heat.  The phrase come hell or high water is used to mean that you are determined to do something, despite any difficulties that you might encounter.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – December 19 prompt which is “More appliance humor”.

The Enemy Is Closer Than You Think

I am watching the Netflix series Versailles where this dude spits in the face of King Louis XIV and says, “the enemy is closer than you think” and then after that the king gets sick. I heard that Trump is starting to worry about getting impeached, as the evidence keeps piling up against him.  Trump’s lies are catching up with him, but nothing will happen till the Muller investigation is over.  I have never seen a bigger cry baby than Trump as he is threatening to shut the government down, if he doesn’t get his way with that stupid wall and he is actually proud of his actions.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – December 5 prompt which is “It’s a Friendly Appliance”.

Whip The Horse’s Eyes

At the very end of the long meandering song ‘Soft Parade’, fourth studio album released on July 18, 1969 by The Doors, Jim Morrison says “When all else fails, we can whip the horse’s eyes And make them sleep, and cry.” Whip the horses eyes comes from the 1866 Russian author Fyodor Dostoevsky’s novel Crime & Punishment.  The term “whipping the horses eyes” means that you have tried every option without success, so why not do the only thing that is left.  Possibly this will be the most violent thing.  Even stranger still is that this image of a horse being beaten is also an important episode in the life of the 19th century German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche, which may have precipitated Nietzsche’s eventual spiral into madness.  The legendary scholar experienced a nervous breakdown when he intervened to stop a carriage cabbie from mercilessly beating his horse.  Morrison’s use of this incident at the very end of the song, stands as a metaphor depicting the only alternative mode of expression left to a race that continues to repress itself.

Excerpt from Crime & Punishment, Outside the tavern stands a very large cart to which a small, skinny mare is harnessed.  A group of drunken peasants come boisterously out of the tavern, and one of them, is a young beefy man called Mikolka, shouting that he will take everyone for a ride in his cart.  His invitation is greeted with derision and laughter, the general observation resting on the age and unfitness of the nag.  Mikolka, however, swears he will make her gallop, and brandishes his whip with relish at the idea.  Several men and one woman get in, and once everyone is in the cart, they are all laughing at the idea.  Two fellows from the crowd get two more whips and run to whip the horse from the side.  Each takes a side.  “On the muzzle, on the eyes, lash her on the eyes!” shouts Mikolka, but the horse can barely move the cart.  The crowd and passengers laugh, but Mikolka is angered and beats the horse savagely.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – December 5 prompt which is “#writerslife”.