Baby It’s Cold Outside

Cold is determined by the lack of molecular movement.  Cold is a relatively low or extremely low temperature, especially when compared to the temperature of the human body, and it is a condition that is the opposite of hot, much less than warm or normal.  Something that is icy, chilly, cool, frigid or frosty would be cold.

At the end of last year the tune ‘Baby It’s Cold Outside’ was seen as being sexist and some radio stations banned it from their play lists, as a long-simmering debate over the lyrics reached a boil.  There is actually no problem with the 1944 Frank Loesser song, it is the scene in the movie Neptune’s Daughter that people have taken an issue with.  Some skeptics felt the lyrics sounded like a prelude to date rape.  The woman keeps protesting, “I ought to say no, no, no, sir,” as he asks to move in closer.  “My sister will be suspicious”, she sings.  “Gosh, your lips look delicious”, he answers.  She wonders aloud what is in her drink.

Some things in this age of political correctness, just don’t make sense any more. Is this flirtatious banter between two consenting adults which may lead to love and romance, or is it a woman who is genuinely resisting a man’s advances and a man who refuses to take “no” for an answer?  Since you are not supposed to judge a book by its cover, then you should also not judge a song by its movie.

Written for Linda G. Hill Life in progress One-Liner Wednesday – January 23 prompt.

Please Let Me Off This Bus

Chuck Berry (1926-2017) was a black pioneer of rock’n roll and he is often called the father of rock and roll.  Black musicians were often targeted for beatings, had their earnings confiscated, and were arrested and imprisoned, typically for sex, drugs and tax violations.  Berry didn’t take up the guitar until he was thirteen years old and in Junior High School.  Before he was able to graduate from High School, Berry was arrested and convicted of robbing a bakery, a clothing store and a barbershop, and also armed carjacking.  He was sent to a reformatory in Algoa Missouri, where he was held for three years from 1944 to 1947.  Berry gained his release on good behavior on October 18, 1947, which was his 21st birthday.  A year later, he was married to Themetta ‘Toddy’ Suggs and they had four children together, and he swore that he was forever cured of heading down the wrong path again.

Berry established his reputation during the four-year period from 1956 to 1959, not only turning out such classic hits as ‘Roll Over Beethoven’, ‘Maybellene’, ‘Johnny B. Goode’, ‘Sweet Little Sixteen’ and ‘Carol’, but he also established the very template that nearly every rock and roll guitarist after him would follow.  On December 23, 1959, Chuck Berry was arrested in St. Louis, Missouri, on charges relating to his transportation of a 14-year-old waitress and prostitute across state lines for allegedly “immoral purposes”.  Chuck Berry was sentenced to three years in prison in January 1962 at the Indiana Federal Penitentiary in Terre Haute, Indiana for offenses under the Mann Act, for this transgression.

Berry met 14-year-old Janice Norine Escalanti in a bar in Juarez, Mexico and he offered her a job in his St. Louis nightclub. Three weeks after, their relationship soured, and she was fired from Berry’s nightclub.  Berry brought her to a bus station, and he gave her money for a ticket home.  Instead of going home, she went to the St. Louis police, and told them that that Berry repeatedly had sex with her while they were on the road, in the back of his Cadillac and Berry was arrested two days later.  The Mann Act is the common name for a piece of federal legislation originally known as the United States White-Slave Traffic Act of 1910.  Though intended as a tool for cracking down on organized prostitution, the vague language of the Mann Act regarding the transportation of women for “immoral purposes” rendered its provisions broadly unenforceable.  It has been selectively applied in various high-profile cases over time, most famously in Berry’s and in that of the heavyweight boxing great Jack Johnson.

Berry claimed the girl told him she was 21.  Berry’s defense was not found credible by the all-male, all-white jury at his first trial, and he was convicted on March 11, 1960, and sentenced to five years’ imprisonment and a $5,000 fine.  Although he would have his conviction vacated and a new trial ordered by a Federal Appeals Court in October 1960 due to disparaging racial comments made by the judge in his original trial, Berry would be convicted again on retrial in March 1961 and serve the better part of the next two years in prison.  Berry wound up serving 20 months behind bars, and during this time he wrote several songs.

While Chuck was behind bars, the Rolling Stones recorded their first single, which was his song ‘Come On’ and the Beatles covered his ‘Roll Over Beethoven’.  In 1964, Chuck Berry recorded ‘Nadine (Is It You?)’ on his The Great Twenty-Eight album and the song charted #27 in the UK and it went to #23 in the US.  While Berry was in jail he penned this song along with other classic numbers such as ‘You Never Can Tell’, ‘Promised Land’ and ‘No Particular Place to Go’.  Marshall Chess, the son of Chess Records founder Leonard was his road manager when he came out of prison and they were desperate because he was their biggest star.  He came right from jail, looking raggedy, so they got him some new clothes and went into the studio and recorded ‘Nadine’.

Berry said that he took the top hits of his past and reshaped them, getting ‘Nadine’ from his debut, 1955 hit ‘Maybellene’. This song tells the story of a man catching sight of an elusive woman and spending the rest of the song chasing Nadine and trying to catch up with her.  He glimpses her while riding a bus, hops off and races after her as she is riding in a coffee-colored Cadillac.  He encounters difficulty catching up to Nadine, and he keeps pursuing her, while only getting momentary or partial views of her and questioning if it is really her.  He sees her “getting in a yellow cab heading up town” then he hops into a taxi telling the driver “to catch that yellow cab”.  He says that she moved “around like a wave of summer breeze”, and he tells his cabbie to “Go, driver, go go, catch ‘er for me please”.

In 1985, he received the Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award.  In 1986, he became the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame’s first inductee.  The scientist Carl Sagan championed the inclusion of Berry’s 1958 hit ‘Johnny B. Goode’ on the so-called Golden Record, an archive of human life launched by NASA into interstellar space with the Voyager probes in 1977.  Chuck Berry died on March 18, 2017 at the age of 90 in his home near St. Louis.

As I got on a city bus and found a vacant seat,
I thought I saw my future bride walking up the street,
I shouted to the driver hey conductor, you must slow down
I think I see her please let me off this bus

Nadine, honey is that you?
Oh, Nadine
Honey, is that you?
Seems like every time I see you
Darling you got something else to do

I saw her from the corner when she turned and doubled back
And started walkin’ toward a coffee colored Cadillac
I was pushin’ through the crowd to get to where she’s at
And I was campaign shouting like a southern diplomat

Nadine, honey is that you?
Oh, Nadine
Honey, where are you?
Seems like every time I catch up with you
You are up to something new

Downtown searching for ‘er, looking all around
Saw her getting in a yellow cab heading up town
I caught a loaded taxi, paid up everybody’s tab
Flipped a twenty dollar bill, told him ‘catch that yellow cab

Nadine, honey is that you?
Oh, Nadine
Honey, is that you?
Seems like every time I catch up with you
You are up to something new

She move around like a wave of summer breeze,
Go, driver, go go, catch ‘er for me please
Moving through the traffic like a mounted cavalier
Leaning out the taxi window trying to make her hear

Nadine, honey is that you?
Oh, Nadine
Honey, is that you?
Seems like every time I see you
Darling are up to something new

Why Did The Cat Die?

The expression “curiosity killed the cat”, is usually used as an attempt to stop someone from asking unwanted questions. Cats are extremely curious from the time they are born due to their survival instincts and a natural instinct to assess their environment for prey and predators.  They are inquisitive when they see something new, because they need to make sure that it doesn’t pose a threat.  Kittens may spend the whole day looking into every corner, watching carefully, observing each movement and catching small prey, bringing them home as trophies.  Cats enjoy climbing because being high up in the air gives them a broader view of their environment, allowing them to easily observe everything without being disturbed.

When cats explore, one thing they are looking for is a potential hiding space.  The experience of jumping and sliding into a box resonates with their instinct to find protected spaces out in the wild where they are able to see their environment without being seen.  It is a good idea to provide boxes and other similar spaces for your cat to climb into as this is an inexpensive way to enrich their home environment.  Try hiding toys in these spaces, and always make sure that the environment is safe for your cat and that your cat can easily retrieve the toys from the box.  Cats use their minds to shape the world around them and they are always seeking answers to why things exist.  Knowing why cats behave in a certain manner, will help you to better understand your cat and provide them with a more comfortable life that is free from possible domestic dangers.

Written for Linda G. Hill’s ‘Life in progress’ JusJoJan January twenty-second prompt suggested by Pamela, Butterfly Sand Curiosity run amok and that is “Curiosity”.

Lawdy Me!

Lawdy me stems from the phrase “Lordy me”, which is a contraction of “Lord help me”.  This is said as an exclamation, “Oh me!”, or “Oh my goodness!”, or “My, my, my!”, or “Good grief Charlie Brown!”  This minced oath is usually used to express surprise and it is often said with a Southern accent as Butterfly McQueen, the actress who played Prissy did in Gone With The Wind, “Lawdy, Miz Scarlett, I don’t know nothin’ ‘bout birthin’ no babies!”.  A minced oath is a euphemistic expression formed by misspelling, mispronouncing, or replacing a part of a profane, blasphemous, or taboo term to reduce the original term’s objectionable characteristics thus allowing a person to avoid swearing when expressing surprise or annoyance.  The word Lawdy goes well with the name Clawdy, just as Dizzy goes good Miss Lizzy, or Good Golly fits in with Miss Molly, the same way as Mary, Mary goes together with quite contrary.  The name Clawdy is most likely a nickname for Claudette, or Claudia, or Claudine.  Lloyd Price wrote the song ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’, but in 1958, Larry Williams, who had been Lloyd’s valet, reworked it to become ‘Dizzy Miss Lizzy’.

Lloyd Price was born in Kenner, Louisiana on March 9, 1933 and he is an American R&B vocalist, known as “Mr. Personality”, after his 1959 million-selling hit, ‘Personality’.  He began writing songs in grade school, and by the time he was 13, he was proficient on piano and trumpet.  He formed a group with his school mates that they called themselves “the Blue Boys”, and they played around Kenner at the Top of the Town and the Perkins Lounge.  Lloyd had a younger brother Little Leo Price, and the teenagers were both exposed to music from the jukebox in their mother’s popular New Orleans sandwich shop, Beatrice’s Fish ‘n’ Fry.  One day Dave Bartholomew discovered Lloyd when he stopped in at Beatrice’s to get a bite to eat and heard the youth working on his new song ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’.

His first recording, ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ became a hit in 1952 and Lloyd Price went on to work in the music industry as a musician, bandleader, songwriter, producer, record-company executive and a booking agent.  While still in high school, nineteen-year-old Lloyd Price was working for New Orleans radio station WBOK.  He provided jingles (music for radio advertisements) for various products, including those hawked by disc jockey James ‘Okey Dokey’ Smith, the first big black disc jockey in New Orleans.  One of Smith’s catch phrases was “Lawdy Miss Clawdy”, which he used in ad slogans such as “Lawdy Miss Clawdy, eat Mother’s Homemade Pies and drink Maxwell House coffee!”

Dave Bartholomew had many talents and roles, but his outstanding accomplishment is his star-making ability.  He discovered Fats Domino, Lloyd Price and a seemingly endless revolving door of New Orleans virtuosos.  He was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, as a nonperformer, in 1991.  Lloyd Price was nursing a broken heart when he wrote this influential R&B wailer on an old piano in his mother’s sandwich shop.  He borrowed the title from James ‘Okey Dokey’ Smith’s catch phrase, as Price bids a painful farewell to the good-looking gold-digger who uses and abuses him.

In 1952, Art Rupe an American music industry executive and record producer and founder of Specialty Records in Los Angeles, came to New Orleans in search of new talent, particularly young singers who would attract the growing market of teens tuning into R&B radio.  Local recording studio owner Cosimo Matassa introduced him to Dave Bartholomew, who co-wrote and produced many of Fats Domino’s early hit records.  Bartholomew invited nineteen-year-old Lloyd Price to audition for Rupe at Matassa’s J&M Studio.  Cosimo Matassa was an American recording engineer whose studio was the center of the New Orleans recording scene for two decades and in 2012 he was he was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as a nonperformer and he was also inducted to the Blues Hall of Fame in 2013.

Price had auditioned the song unsuccessfully several times at J&M, and when he went to this tryout that was supervised by label owner Art Rupe, Price decided to sing something else.  When his turn finally came, Rupe was unimpressed as he had been with most of the day.  It looked like he was going back to the West Coast empty-handed.  Price sensed that he was going to be shown the door, and he nearly broke down in tears as he belted out ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’.  Rupe hired Bartholomew to produce the recording session for ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’.  On the day of the session, Fats Domino happened to be passing the studio in a brand new Cadillac.  He stopped in just to say, “Hello”, but after he had a few drinks, Domino agreed to play on the session despite his initial reluctance.  He was under contract to Imperial, but that didn’t stop him from supplying one of the catchiest piano intros in the history of recorded music.  He started playing a boogie-woogie, but Dave stopped him because he wanted something different.  So instead of playing boogie-woogie, Fats played the introduction like a tinkling piano roll.  To this day, nobody has ever played that intro like Fats did that day.

Lloyd Price did not have a band to support him on this recording, so Dave let him use his band for this song.  The drummer was Earl Palmer and the rest of Dave’s band included Ernest McLean on guitar, Frank Fields on bass, Herbert Hardesty on tenor sax, Joe Harris on alto sax, and Jack Willis was on trumpet.  There was no sheet music it was all in their heads.  They called it ‘padding’ with the horns holding their notes they played while Lloyd sang.  Dave Bartholomew decided the song was too short and that it needed more of a story, so Price wrote the second verse, “Because I gave you all my money, girl, but you just won’t treat me right” on the spot as he was able to make up lyrics on the fly.  Price didn’t hear the song until it was played on the radio four weeks after the recording session.  When the record came out, Price’s mother moved it to the top spot on her shop’s jukebox.

The song was released on Rupe’s Specialty Records and went to #1 on the R&B chart.  Although it didn’t reach the pop chart, the song did sell well outside of the R&B market and is considered an early crossover hit.  At the time, many industry execs would tack their names onto songs they had little or nothing to do with to get a cut of the royalties.  At best, the real songwriters would receive a sliver of the bounty, and at worst they wouldn’t get credit at all.  To his astonishment, Price was listed as the sole songwriter, with only the publishing rights going to Rupe.  Several artists have covered this, including Elvis Presley, Little Richard, The Hollies, The Dave Clark Five, Fats Domino, Conway Twitty, Carl Perkins, The Replacements, Joe Cocker And The Grease Band and Paul McCartney, among others.  The Beatles also recorded it for their 1969 movie Let It Be.

In April 1952, Specialty Records released ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ and on May 17, 1952 it spread like wild fire and entered Billboard’s R&B chart, staying there a total of 26 weeks.  The song reached number one, where it spent seven weeks there, a feat that wasn’t surpassed by another New Orleans record until Domino’s ‘Blueberry Hill’.  ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ became the song of the year in 1952 and the first record to sell a million copies by a teenager.  Lloyd Price was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1998.  According to the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ made the list of The Top 500 Most Influential Rock Songs.  Loyd has 4 songs listed on Rolling Stone Fifty Essential Recordings From The Fifties including ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’, ‘Stagger Lee’, ‘Personality’ and ‘I’m Gonna Get Married’.  ‘Lawdy Miss Clawdy’ is also on the list of 660 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll.

Well, lawdy, lawdy, lawdy, Miss Clawdy
Well, you sure look good to me
Well, please, don’t excite me, baby
I know it can’t be me

Well, I give you all my money
Yeah, but you just won’t treat me right
You like to ball every morning
Don’t come home till late at night

I’m gonna tell, tell my mama
Lord, I swear, gal, what you been doing to me?
I’m gonna tell everybody that
I’m in misery

So bye, bye, bye, baby
Gal, I won’t be comin’ no more
Goodbye, little darlin’
Down the road I go

Oh, goodbye, bye, bye, baby
Gal, I won’t be comin’ no more
Goodbye, little darlin’
Down the road I go

Blind As A Bat

Being blind as a bat, isn’t really being blind.  Bats are not blind, they actually have excellent vision.  Bats use echolocation to navigate and find food in the dark.  To echolocate, bats send out sound waves from the mouth or nose.  When the sound waves hit an object they produce echoes.  The echo bounces off the object and returns to the bats’ ears.  Their vision gives them a much more complete picture, and at higher resolution, than an ultrasonic image, but when they combine their eyesight with their echolocation they achieve a sort of 20/20 super-vision.  Bats have learned that insect activity peaks at night, so they come out at dusk for their meals.  Bats are able to find insects faster than any bird.

It turns out that many of the stories about bats are just myths.  Bats are not dirty and they generally don’t bother people at all.  They look sort of creepy, especially when they are hanging upside down, but they won’t try to make a nest in your hair, as they don’t make nests.  Their guano, a spiffy word for bat poop helps to disperse seeds and regenerate plants.  Bats are pollinators, so if you enjoy bananas or avocados, you need to thank bats for that.  Bats eat the type of insects that enjoy eating crops and gardens, so keeping bats around is a good thing.  Bats can have rabies so you should never disturb a bat.

Written for Linda G. Hill’s ‘Life in progress’ JusJoJan January twenty-first prompt suggested by Lady Lee, ladyleemanila and that is “Echo”.

Making Discoveries By Accident

You stumble upon something that has grand and mysterious significance, but as Louis Pasteur famously stated, “Chance favors the prepared mind.”  Serendipity will not occur unless you exercise your powers of observation.  Sudden flashes of insight don’t just happen, they are the products of preparation.  The origins of the word serendipity stems from a Persian Fairy Tale called “The Three Princes of Serendip”.  The three brothers meet a camel driver who just lost his camel.  He inquires if they had seen it, and purely as a joke the princes supplied the camel driver with all sorts of semi-contrived details.  The first prince asks, “Was your camel blind in one eye?” “Yes,” responded the camel driver.  And the second prince said, “Did your camel have a tooth missing?”  “Yes,” the owner said again.  The third asked if his camel was lame.  “Yes,” said the driver.

The driver retraced the Princes’ steps along the trail, but he did not find his camel. When he encountered them again, he accused them of deception, but the first prince said, “Your camel carried a load of butter on one side and of honey on the other.”  The second said that the camel also carried a woman, and the third prince added that she was pregnant.  The camel driver was now convinced that anyone who knew all of these details must have stolen his camel, so he had the princes jailed as camel thieves.  When emperor heard about the crime, he sentenced the princes to death.  They then confessed they had played a joke on the camel driver, and that their imaginations must have gotten the better of them because some of their descriptions happened to coincide with the truth.  Later, when the real camel was found, the emperor released the princes.

He then inquired how could they have guessed so many details. The brothers, told him the following camel story, “I thought he must have been blind in the right eye, because only the grass along the left side of the trail was eaten even though it was not as thick as that over on the right side.”  “I guessed that the camel lacked a tooth because the way the grass cuds were chewed indicated that a tooth was missing.”  “I guessed that the camel was lame because only three footprints were clearly indicated, whereas the fourth print was dragged.”

They continued, “I guessed that the camel had a load of butter on one side because there were many ants on one side of the trail, and I thought he carried honey on the other side because many flies gathered along the other side of the trail.” “I guessed that the camel must have carried a woman because I noted a footprint and found some female urine near where the camel had knelt.”  And the third prince concluded, “I guessed that the woman was pregnant because the hand prints nearby showed that she had helped herself up with her hands after urinating.”

Written for Linda G. Hill’s ‘Life in progress’ JusJoJan January twentieth prompt suggested by Jill, J-Dubs Grin and Bear It and that is “Serendipity”.

Ancient Blues Lines And Train References

Smokestack Lightnin’ was written by Chester Arthur Burnett who is better known as Howlin’ Wolf.  This song is timeless and evocative, it enthralls anyone who listen to it, as it is a distillation of the essence of the blues.  Wolf said the song was inspired by watching trains in the night, sitting out in the country and seeing the trains go by that ran on coal in those days, watching the sparks come out of the smokestack and that was the smokestack lightning.  Howlin’ Wolf recorded ‘Smokestack Lightning’ in Chicago in January 1956.  Longtime Wolf guitarist Hubert Sumlin is credited with the distinctive guitar line.  Howlin’ Wolf sang and played harmonica, backed by pianist Hosea Lee Kennard, guitarists Willie Johnson and Hubert Sumlin, bassist Willie Dixon, and drummer Earl Phillips.  Guitarist Hubert Sumlin played with Howlin’ Wolf for over twenty years, from the time he joined the blues legend’s band in 1954 until Wolf’s death in 1976.

In 1956, ‘Smokestack Lightning’ reached number 11 in the Billboard R&B chart and it was Wolf’s single greatest recording in a career full of amazing recordings.  It had been a part of Wolf’s repertoire as far back as the early 1930s.  Its lyrics were inspired, in part, by Charlie Patton’s ‘Moon Going Down’ and the Mississippi Sheik’s ‘Stop and Listen Blues’.  Wolf had already recorded a version of it for RPM in 1951 as ‘Crying at Daybreak’.  Lyrically the song is a collection of short, clipped verses around the general themes of romantic betrayal and the need to catch a train and leave his mistreatment behind and thus it often has different lyrics when other groups cover it.

Over the years, “Smokestack Lightning” has been covered by numerous artists both in live performance and on recordings. Among these are artists as diverse as Muddy Waters, the Yardbirds, the Animals, George Thorogood, Van Morrison, Etta James, Quicksilver Messenger Service, Grateful Dead, John Lee Hooker, Bob Dylan, The Allman Brothers Band, The Who, The Kinks, Led Zeppelin, Manfred Mann, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Aerosmith, Eric Clapton and The Rolling Stones to name but a few.

‘Smokestack Lightning’ has also received numerous awards over the years.  In 1985, the song was inducted into the Blues Foundation’s Blues Hall of Fame in its ‘Classics of Blues Recordings Singles or Album Tracks’ category.  It was further honored by the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999 as a recording of lasting historical musical importance.  In 2004, it was ranked number 29 in Rolling Stone’s list of “The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.”  And in 2009, ‘Smokestack Lightning’ received the highest recognition that any recording can receive from the United States government when it was selected for permanent preservation into the Library of Congress for the National Recording Registry.

This song starts out with a lone guitar setting the beat and feel of the song.  The rest sounds like there are two guitars playing, but Hubert Sumlin manages to play both the rhythm and lead guitar with this one classic riff that repeats all throughout the song with some tiny variations.  Charley Patton recorded the song, ‘Moon Going Down’ on May 28, 1930 and some of the lyrics are, “Lord, the smokestack is black and the bell it shine like, bell it shine like, bell it shine like gold. Aw the smokestack is black and the bell it shine like gold.”  The second verse of ‘Stop and Listen Blues’ by Mississippi Sheiks which was recorded in 1930 and it says, “Cryin’, smokestack lightning That bell that shine like gold”.  Howlin’ Wolf took some of this as he starts his song out with simular lyrics, “Ah oh, smokestack lightnin’ Shinin’, just like gold.”  Wolf howls at the end of each verse which works perfectly for this song.

Howlin’ Wolf is up on a hill one night and his attention is drawn to the gold embers coming out of an approaching train’s smokestack and he says, “Why don’t ya hear me cryin’?”, because he is sad that his woman is not with him.  He goes on to say, “Whoa oh, tell me, baby Where did ya, stay last night?”, as he has been hurt by her not coming back to him last night.  Now he is angry and confused and he is thinking about putting her on the next train outta here, so he says, “Whoa-oh, stop your train Let her, go for a ride.”  I imagine that it is also possible that he hopped on the train and hightailed it out of there as some alternate lyrics say, “Stop your train Let a poor boy ride.”  I guess that he sent her away or he left on this train, because he next says, “Whoa-oh, fare ya well Never see, a you no more.”  Wolf concludes by singing, “Whoa-oh, who been here baby since, I-I been gone, a little, bitty boy Girl, be on Whoo hoo”, which I think that this concerns him boasting about his male prowess like he is some kind of sex machine, making a statement that he is more of a man than the others that his girl has been with.

Ah oh, smokestack lightnin’
Shinin’, just like gold
Why don’t ya hear me cryin’?

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Whoa oh, tell me, baby
What’s the, matter with you?
Why don’t ya hear me cryin’?

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Whoa oh, tell me, baby
Where did ya, stay last night?
A-why don’t ya hear me cryin’?

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Whoa-oh, stop your train
Let her, go for a ride
Why don’t ya hear me cryin’?

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Whoa-oh, fare ya well
Never see, a you no more
A-why don’t ya hear me cryin’?

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Whoa-oh, who been here baby since,
I-I been gone, a little, bitty boy
Girl, be on

Whoo hoo
Whoo hoo
Whoo

Written for 1/20/19 Helen Vahdati’s This Thing Called Life One Word at a Time Song Lyric Sunday Theme where the prompt is “Crying/Sadness”.