Flowers Everywhere

The Cowsills hit song ‘The Rain, The Park and Other Things’ was written by Artie Kornfeld and Steven William Duboff.  The Cowsills are an interesting phenomenon in the history of American pop music.  The group originally formed in 1965 with just two brothers (Billy and Bob) but they became a true family band, and at some point, all six siblings (Bill, Bob, Barry, John, Paul & Susan) plus mom Barbara were in the band.  They could all play their instruments and sing lead or harmony.  In 1967 they released their first album and a hit single that is a perfect time capsule of that period, the sunshine pop classic ‘The Rain, The Park & Other Things’.  The song charted #2 in the US and Susan Cowsill was only nine years old when this reached the Top 10, making her the youngest rock performer to have a Top 10 hit in America.  The Cowsills were the first of the sibling-oriented groups like The Jackson 5 and The Osmonds.  The Cowsills made many television appearances during the late 1960s and the early 1970s and they were an inspiration for the Partridge Family.

This is a very happy song as this guy sees a girl sitting in the rain and the raindrops were falling on her, but she didn’t seem to care.  She just sat there and smiled at him with flowers in her hair.  Right then he knew that she was the one to make him happy.  He had to say hello when she caught his eye and when he did that, she took his hand and they walked through the park alone seeing flowers everywhere.  She seemed so sweet and kind, that he wondered if he was losing his mind.  Suddenly the sun broke through and when he turned around, she was gone and all he had left was one little flower from her hair.  He was not sure if she was reality or just a dream, but she had made him happy.

Artie Kornfeld is a singer, songwriter, record producer and music executive, who best known as the music promoter and creator of the Woodstock Festival that was held in 1969.  Kornfeld found himself with a record deal and he appeared on stage with Dion and the Belmonts singing backup with The Skyliners.  Kornfeld met Cass Elliot of the Mamas and the Papas when he was in college.  Artie Kornfeld was a member of The Changin’ Times. Kornfeld became the vice president of Capitol Records in his early 20’s, making him the youngest to hold the position and the first vice president of rock and roll ever.  By 1966, Kornfeld had written over 75 Billboard charged songs and participated in over 150 albums.  The song was recorded at A&R studios which was managed by Phil Ramone.

Woodstock was a four-man effort, involving Artie Kornfeld, Michael Lang, Joel Rosenman, and John P. Roberts.  Artie wrote several songs for his group The Changin’ Times and a couple for The Cowsills.  Along with Brian Wilson, Jan Berry and Roger Christian he wrote ‘Dead Man’s Curve’ for Jan & Dean and collaborating with Gerry Goffin and Toni Wine he wrote ‘Only to Other People’ for The Cookies.  Other songs that he wrote are ‘I Adore Him’ by The Angels, ‘Guess Who?’ by Dusty Springfield, ‘Judy Loves Me’ by Johnny Crawford, ‘Tonight You’re Gonna Fall in Love with Me’ by The Shirelles and ‘Another Page’ by Connie Francis.  Artie was the Manager and Creative Director of the band Survivor and he took this unknown band to the top selling single of all time ‘Eye of the Tiger’.  Kornfeld lost his first wife in the early ‘80s and then his 16-year-old daughter to a drug overdose.  Artie Kornfeld won a HMMA Hollywood Music in Media Awards Lifetime Achievement Award in 2010.

Steven Duboff co-wrote with Artie Kornfeld the ‘60s hits ‘The Rain, The Park and Other Things’ and ‘We Can Fly’ which were recorded by the Cowsills, and Crispian St. Peters’ ‘The Pied Piper’.  He and Kornfeld were also the recording and performing in the group The Changin’ Times, who opened on tour for Sonny and Cher.  Later he worked as an A&R executive at ABC Records.  Duboff also wrote songs for Ringo Starr, the Turtles, Connie Francis, Al Hirt, Wayne Newton, the Addrisi Brothers, the Monkees, the Bon Aires and more, working with co-writers including Doug Morris, Gerry Robinson and Neil Levinson, with whom he ran Du-Lev Productions.  Duboff produced records for the Insect Trust (who he also managed), the Emeralds, Hugh McCracken, Guy Mitchell, Bit A Sweet and Lenny Williams.  Duboff died in 2014 at the age of 62.

I saw her sitting in the rain
Raindrops falling on her
She didn’t seem to care
She sat there and smiled at me
And I knew (I knew, I knew, I knew, I knew)
She could make me happy (happy, happy)
Flowers in her hair, flowers everywhere
I love the flower girl
Oh, I don’t know just why
She simply caught my eye
I love the flower girl she seemed so sweet and kind.
She crept into my mind.
I knew I had to say hello (hello, hello)
She smiled up at me
She took my hand and we walked through the park alone
But I knew (I knew, I knew, I knew, I knew)
She had made me happy (happy, happy)
Flowers in her hair, flowers everywhere
I love the flower girl
Oh, I don’t know just why
She simply caught my eye
I love the flower girl she seemed so sweet and kind
She crept into my mind
Suddenly the sun broke through (see the sun).
I turned around she was gone (where did she go).
And all I had left was one little flower from her hair.
But I knew (I knew, I knew, I knew, I knew)
She had made me happy (happy, happy).
Flowers in her hair, flowers everywhere
I love the flower girl
Was she reality or just a dream to me?
I love the flower girl
Our love shall lead the way
To find a sunny day
I love the flower girl
Was she reality or just a dream to me?

Written for Love Is In Da Blog where Bee asks us to find a song with love & flowers and the prompt is thanks to Barbara.

8 thoughts on “Flowers Everywhere

    1. They wanted to call this song the Flower Girl, but they thought it might get confused with the San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair) song that was written by John Phillips, and sung by Scott McKenzie, so it ended up with a much longer title.

      Liked by 1 person

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