All Work and no Play

Ever since Jack was a child, he did his devoir, but his parents always demanded more and they never coddled him.  When school ended, he walked home from the bus stop and went directly to his room to study, it was a special place devoid of distractions where he could concentrate on his homework.  He was working on his composition about Olbers’ paradox, an argument that the darkness of the night sky conflicts with the assumption of an infinite and eternal static universe.  He was almost done explaining this, but there was a lacuna preventing him from getting the ending that he desired.  He was scared that he would not get his usual A on this Physics project, that is until he read the Edgar Allan Poe essay Eureka.  He knew that Poe came up with the perfect reason for why the sky was dark, so he tousled his hair and finished his writing.

Next, he opened up his Advanced Placement Calculus book where he was studying the Cantor set, because these strange and interesting mathematical spaces began to stir his imagination.  He was dizzy just thinking how the Cantor set is created by taking away the middle portion of a line segment and repeating that process forever.  He got up in a huff from his plush chair, which made a tiny squeak, as he needed to stretch his legs a bit before diving into Chemistry.  He was getting positive results in his efforts to effectively mix solids and liquids to create the optimal slurry for his homemade peanut brittle.  He was able to earn a lot of money from his candy, once he learned not to ventilate it by forced air and allow it to cool naturally.

Jack saved his favorite subject for last, AP United States History, which covers American history from about the time Native Americans first encountered Europeans to the present day.  He found it interesting that during World War II, pressed soy beans and cardboard were used to manufacture license plates, because they wanted to save all the metal for military needs.  His parents were picking up Kentucky Fried Chicken for dinner and as he devoured his meal, he would try not to think about their Zoroastrianism symbolism, where they were seen as a benign spirit that would cluck to herald a turning point in the cosmic struggle between darkness and light.  After dinner he would go down to the jetty to see his girl, but all this studding was making him grey before his time.

Written for Sheryl’s Daily Word Prompt – Ventilate, for Roger Shipp’s Daily Addictions prompt – Scared, for the Daily Spur prompt – Positive, for FOWC with Fandango – Licence, for November Writing Prompts – The perfect reason, for Ragtag Community – Stir, for Di’s Three Things Challenge prompt words – Child Composition Jetty, for Word of the Day Challenge Prompt – Earn and for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Wordle #158 – Grey Huff Squeak Bus Stop Brittle Devoir Slurry Lacuna Tousled Plush Dizzy Cluck.

10 thoughts on “All Work and no Play

    1. I don’t make up the prompt words, but I did read that devoir is a French word. Something that Felicia said yesterday when she was talking about Whitney Houston “Seems like the brightest stars have the most darkness inside” made me think about Olbers’ Paradox.

      Liked by 2 people

  1. I really enjoyed this post, Jim. Would you expand a bit on this part?

    His parents were picking up Kentucky Fried Chicken for dinner and as he devoured his meal, he would try not to think about their Zoroastrianism symbolism, where they were seen as a benign spirit that would cluck to herald a turning point in the cosmic struggle between darkness and light.

    [As to the entire post, it has me wondering how you might get your fiction published.]

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s