Scumbags

I never wanted to be a politician, as I think that all these people do is take from society and they never give anything back. Politicians are supposed to have a caring attitude that allows them to commit their best efforts toward the public welfare, but it seems that most of them are only interested in gaining money, status or power.  The 32nd president of the United States Franklin D. Roosevelt referring to the owners of power utilities whose actions he deemed to be against the interests of the American people said, “My friends, judge me by the enemies I have made.”  In politics, enemies are made, but there are no permanent enemies, and no permanent friends, there are only permanent interests.  Politicians think that they are right, because they won an election and they develop their own preferences instead of trying to compromise and allow people to cooperate with each other.  They use things and people, as tools to achieve their result and public figures make us hate their enemies, so they can get their way.

Politicians need to make deals, in order to get any legislation passed and every time that they make a deal, a little bit of grease from that deal ends up sticking to them.  When any politician makes his or her way out of the bush leagues up to the top of the political chain, they are very greasy.  It is not abnormal for politicians have a license to steal, and this becomes poignant to their constituents when they are fleeced.  The Supreme Court insisted that political spending is a form of protected free speech, and this gives all politicians a monopoly to collect money from wealthy donors.  As the US heads closer toward the 2020 elections, all politicians will utilize campaign staffers to work the phones in hopes of encouraging a larger voter turnout, and making a mad dash for donations, which will lead to a significant rise in unwanted calls from these pests.

Roman Emperor Tiberius allegedly conducted sexual experiments on goldfish, ushering in an era of decadence and the sadistically wacky Nero drained the treasury to support his elaborate lifestyle.  Much of Rome was burned in the great fire of 64 and it is often said that Rome was lost as Nero played his fiddle, but he actually played a lyre or a cithara, as the fiddle didn’t even exist during ancient Rome.  Nero may or may not have been responsible for the blaze, but he did take advantage of the situation, by building himself a verdant landscaped palace on the land that was destroyed.  Nero accused the early Christians for setting the fire, making them the scapegoats and somehow he was able to make this logic click with the people.  He was a despicable character with an insidious reputation who got what he deserved in the end, because he was too interested in debauchery to take a bold and billowy stance about anything that would help the people.  Nero tried to wreck a ship that his mother was on, in an attempt to kill her.  After a turbulent 13-year reign, the Roman senate ran out of patience and declared Nero to be a public enemy and he became the final Roman emperor of the Julio-Claudian dynasty.

Nero married a castrated man named Sporus, and he played the role of a bride to his bedfellows Doryphorus and Pythagoras, which lead to him being called the rainbow emperor.  Nero thought of himself as being a charioteer and a singer and there is a good chance that he may have been up on the roof watching as Rome burnt.  Nero was performing in a theater when the legions revolted and he fled the city in disguise when he heard about a plot against his life.  When they caught up to him, a few of his faithful followers dug a grave for him and he burst into a verse of Homer’s song, “The gallop of swift footed horses strikes on my ear”, and when he finished singing he committed suicide.  Elvis impersonators need to be able to sing, and the first professional Elvis impersonator actually didn’t look like Elvis and he only saw his career take off when he stopped sitting at the piano and began to gyrate his hips onstage.  It is no accident that the first Nero impersonator was able to pass himself off as Nero in part because of his musical impersonation.

Written for Tyler M Deal 5 Words Prompt – Verdant Dash License Piano Final, for Sheryl’s Daily Word Prompt – Poignant, for Roger Shipp’s Daily Addictions prompt – Wreck, for the Daily Spur prompt – Click, for FOWC with Fandango – Abnormal, for August Monthly Writing Prompts – Bold and billowy, for Ragtag Community – Bush, for Reena’s Exploration Challenge #102 – Public figures make us hate their enemies, for Sara’s Closet Full Of Notebooks Prompt – Rainbow, for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Tale Weaver – #238 – August 29 – Pests, for Paula’s Three Things Challenge prompt words – Monopoly Goldfish Rome and for Word of the Day Challenge Prompt – Lost.

13 thoughts on “Scumbags

  1. Highly informative piece, especially historical tidbits on Nero!

    Politicians or similar players in religion, corporates or business weaken people’s minds and discourage independent thinking. Without developing an army of mute and blind implementers, they will never succeed in their nefarious plans.

    Thanks for joining in!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Reena. Your prompt “Public figures make us hate their enemies” fit in perfectly with what Nero did to the Christians. Nero made the Romans hate the Christians and that got him off the hook for the fire.

      Liked by 2 people

    1. Thanks Christine. I had one prompt left being piano and it did not seem to fit anywhere, but then I found the story about the Elvis impersonator and I got the prompt in. I read that there were actually three different people that tried to impersonate Nero and I think that they were all killed. Much worse than just being booed off stage for doing a bad job of pretending to be Elvis.

      Like

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