Gender Change

Ray Edward ‘Eddie’ Cochran (October 3, 1938–April 17, 1960) was an American rock and roll pioneer who, in his brief career, he had a small but lasting influence on rock music through his guitar playing.  Cochran’s rockabilly songs, such as ‘C’mon Everybody’, ‘Somethin’ Else’, and ‘Summertime Blues’, captured teenage frustration and desire in the late 1950s and early 1960s.  He experimented with multi-track recording and overdubbing even on his earliest singles, and he was also able to play piano, bass and drums.  His image as a sharply dressed, rugged but good-looking young man with a rebellious attitude epitomized the stance of the Fifties rocker, and in death he achieved an iconic status.

Ricki Page was born June Evelyn Kuykendall on November 7, 1929, in Lindsay, Oklahoma she had eight children with her husband George Motola.  She was an aspiring songwriter when she moved from Fresno, CA. to Hollywood, with nothing but ten dollars in cash, and a million dollars worth of confidence.  She met George after she got a job at a Jewish deli when he left her a five dollar tip.  He invited her to his office for an interview, but she never went because she thought he was a wolf.  Later that week George showed up back at the deli, a little upset, wondering what happened to her.  She asked a friend to go with her this time so there would be no funny business and she was really surprised to find that George was working in the office with Leiber and Stoller, who were writing the music for Jailhouse Rock and also some Coasters stuff which impressed her.  George asked her to sing some of the songs she wrote, which he didn’t seem particularly interested in, but he liked her voice and he wanted to record her, and they were a pair from that moment on.  Ricky wrote most of the lyrics for the song writing team of Page and Motola and I guess the music arrangement credit goes to George.

Ricky Page discovered these kids called The G Notes, who were three sisters, 12 year old Linda, 10 year old Nancy, and 3 year old Coleen, while she was watching them perform on an amateur show and she brought them to her husband George’s attention.  Their father, Sam Gino, built a recording studio for them in his home in Thousand Oaks, California.  Eddie Cochran and Ricki Page were both on Liberty Records at this time and Eddie became a very dear friend of both George Motola and Ricki Page.  In 1959, The G Notes recorded the song ‘Johnny, Johnny, Johnny’ which was written by George & Ricky, they released this record on Guyden.  Eddie Cochran was hired to play guitar for the G-Notes session on ‘Johnny, Johnny, Johnny’ and he fell in love with the song, so he asked if he could record it, thus the title of this song changed from ‘Johnny, Johnny, Johnny’ to ‘Jeannie, Jeannie, Jeannie’.

Rickie Page was an American session singer and a member of The Georgettes who were named after her husband/co-writer/producer George Motola.  She was also a backup singer of her three daughters’ group The Majorettes.  Some of the group names Ricky Page played in and recorded under are: Beverly and the Motorscooters, and Joanne & The Triangles, June And Joy, The Page Sisters (With her sister Sonya), The Austin Sisters, Becky & The Lollipops, The Crypt-Kickers, The Bergenaires and The Bermudas.

‘Jeannie, Jeannie, Jeannie’ by Eddie Cochran was recorded and released in January 12, 1958 on Liberty Records.  It was a minor hit for Cochran and stalled at number 94 on the Billboard charts.  ‘Jeannie, Jeannie, Jeannie’ was posthumously released in the United Kingdom in 1961 on the London Records label and rose to number 31.  Eddie Cochran sings vocals and plays guitar, Conny ‘Guybo’ Smith plays electric bass, Earl Palmer is on drums and it is thought that Ray Johnson plays piano on this song.

Rock and Roll was still a new sound in the late 50’s, kids listened because they never heard anything like it before, they reacted and they became converted.  Rock & Roll became much more than just music for many young people, it was an obsession, and a way that young people wanted to live their lives.  This guy has a girl named Jeanie and he likes her name so much that he always uses it three times in a row.  He invites her to dance with him and he tells her that he will teach her all of the steps including how to hop, bop, slop, rock and roll and the stroll.  He is wearing his blue suede shoes which is a tribute to Carl Perkins.  He tells her that she won’t have to wait, because he will be ready at eight knocking at her door. Since Carl Perkins also sang ‘Go Cat Go’, he says that all the cats are hoppin’ at the big five-four of which I have no clue what the big five-four is.  He tells Jeanie that when they reach the hall, that they will rock around the clock and really have a ball, which is a reference to the 1952 song written by Max C. Freedman and James E. Myers.  This song is basically about having a good time with Baby Boomers rocking their socks off, feeling the need to exult with Chuck Berry and Elvis.

Well, Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie, come and dance with me
Well, I’ll teach you every dance from across the sea
Yeah, first we’ll hop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll bop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll slop, rock and roll, well, do the stroll

Well, Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie, got my blue suede shoes
A pink carnation and my black slacks too
Well, first we’ll hop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll bop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll slop, rock and roll, well, do the stroll

Well, baby baby, you won’t have to wait
I’ll be ready at eight
I keep a-knockin’ at your front door
All the cats are hoppin’ at the big five-four

Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie, when we reach the hall
Well, we’ll rock around the clock and really have a ball
Yeah, first we’ll hop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll bop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll slop, rock and roll, well, do the stroll, yeah!

Well, baby baby, you won’t have to wait
I’ll be ready at eight
I keep a-knockin’ at your front door
All the cats are hoppin’ at the big five-four

Jeanie, Jeanie, Jeanie, when we reach the hall
Well, we’ll rock around the clock and really have a ball
Well, first we’ll hop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll bop
Yeah, yeah, yeah, then we’ll slop, rock and roll, well, do the stroll

Written for FOWC with Fandango – Credit and for Ragtag Community – Exult.

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