The Only Time I Feel Alright

‘All Day and All of the Night’ by the Kinks was released in 1965 on the American studio album Kinks-Size and it reached #2 on the UK Singles Chart and #7 on the United States Charts.  It is similar in beat and structure to their previous hit ‘You Really Got Me’, and both recordings have similar background vocals, progressions, and guitar solos.  Ray Davies wrote this song at the age of 19 and he said that most of the songs that he wrote were about the people living within a square mile of where he grew up, as he had no life experience and had never travelled, so he was inspired by his friends and family.  It appeared as #57 on Pure Pop’s list of The 100 Best Singles of All Time and it is listed in position 48 of the greatest guitar songs of the 60s.  The Kinks were a one-of-a-kind band featuring Ray Davies, a brilliant songwriter and his brother Dave, an unheralded guitarist, along with Pete Quaife on bass and Mick Avory on drums.

The Kinks first came to the U.S. in 1965 and were considered part of the British Invasion, and they rose from humble beginnings as “Muswell Hillbillies” to reach rock music superstardom, but they never achieved the success of the Beatles or the Rolling Stones or the Who.  They made some great songs like ‘Victoria’, ‘Come Dancing’, ‘Apeman’, ‘Lola’, ‘Catch Me Now I’m Falling’ and ‘Tired of Waiting For You’ among others.  The Kinks were one of the most influential bands of the British Invasion and they are seen as one of the forerunners of punk rock, although the Kinks had way too many sounds and styles to comfortably fit in any one category.  They drew on rock and roll, folk, blues, incorporating elements of country, British music hall and theater music making their name originally on two riff-laden singles that pointed the way to hard rock genres from garage to punk to metal and traditional pop.

Ray Davies was born on June 21, 1944, in London, England, and he got his first guitar when he was 13.  At 16, he performed his first show with his younger brother Dave, and the following year, they recruited two classmates to form their first band, The Ray Davies Quartet.  The Ray Davies Quartet featured Ray Davies who sang and played guitar, Rod Stewart on vocals, Pete Quaife electric bass, Dave Davies lead guitar and John Start on drums.  Ray met Rod Stewart while they both attended Hornsey College of Art, but Rod Stewart was kicked out of the band because John Start’s mother complained that his voice was not good enough.  Over the next few years, they changed their name to the Ramrods, then Bollweevils and The Ravens, before becoming on The Kinks in 1964.

The Kinks were oddballs from the very beginning.  Ray Davies is a bit of a mystery, being a person who has suffered for his appreciation of music, but at the same time he also managed to create one of the most tantalizing original and literate bodies of work in all of popular music that is anything but transitory.  The two brothers Ray and Dave Davies could not have been more different with Ray being an introvert, and Dave an extrovert rebel.  The Kinks first started out touring with The Hollies and The Dave Clark Five and after completing the tour the band, put out their first song written by Ray, that was called ‘You Really Got Me’ and this turned The Kinks into a household name.

The band’s third single, ‘You Really Got Me’, was much noisier and more dynamic, and this became the blueprint for the Kinks’ early sound.  The Kinks were recording music at a breakneck pace, they were touring relentlessly, which caused tension within the band.  Conflict was inherent to the Kinks as Davies and his brother had a contentious relationship from childhood, and their tension fueled and disrupted their musical pursuits and they weren’t the only ones fighting.  The Kinks became known as rock ‘n’ roll’s ultimate dysfunctional family and the tensions within the band made them their own worst enemy.  They seemed to find trouble wherever they went, skipping a show in Sacramento and getting into fights on stage and while on tour in 1965, drummer Mick Avory knocked Dave Davies unconscious in the middle of a show, after Dave Davies insulted him and kicked over his drum set.  Their biggest trouble came when they appeared on a Dick Clark special for NBC without paying their mandatory dues to the American Federation of Television and Recording Artists which caused them to be blacklisted.  At the conclusion of their summer 1965 American tour, the Kinks were banned from re-entering the United States for four years, which not only meant that the group was deprived of the world’s largest music market, but that they were effectively cut off from the musical and social upheavals of the late ‘60s.  The group disbanded after lacklustre releases in the Nineties and creative tensions between the two brothers.  Their last public performance was in 1996, but Ray Davies announced this June that The Kinks would be reuniting for the first time in more than 20 years.

The UK courts ordered The Doors to pay royalties to The Kinks songwriters for borrowing their riff from ‘All Day and All of the Night’ for their song ‘Hello, I Love You.’  The Doors admitted that they borrowed the opening riff from the Kinks.  In 1968, Ray Davies met Jim Morrison when the Doors came to London’s Roundhouse and reminded Jim of the plagiarism.  Jim said “You really got me.”

I’m not content to be with you in the daytime
Girl I want to be with you all of the time
The only time I feel alright is by your side
Girl I want to be with you all of the time
All day and all of the night
All day and all of the night
All day and all of the night

I believe that you and me last forever
Oh yeah, all day and nighttime yours, leave me never
The only time I feel alright is by your side
Girl I want to be with you all of the time
All day and all of the night
All day and all of the night
Oh, come on

I believe that you and me last forever
Oh yeah, all day and nighttime yours, leave me never
The only time I feel alright is by your side
Girl I want to be with you all of the time
All day and all of the night
All day and all of the night-time
All day and all of the night

Written for FOWC with Fandango – Tantalizing, for Randomness Inked Scribbling the Unspoken Let it Bleed Weekly Prompt Challenge 23 where the prompt is “Transitory”, for Sheryl’s A New Daily Post Word Prompt – Appreciation and for Scotts Daily Prompt – Mystery.

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