The Apothecary

He was a US citizen who spent time in Jamaica learning myalism from a tribal chief named Bambara, who taught him this folk religion which focused on the power of ancestors, and always involved clapping hands, drumming, dancing, spirit possession, ritual sacrifice, and herbal cures, before he was awarded a Rhodes scholarship that provided him with two years of study and then he opted for a third at Oxford University in England.  After graduating he spent a year travelling abroad and during that time he went to India and Africa, and this is why he was referred to as a wanderjahr.  He was always an honorable man and he achieved significant fame for some of his exploits.  While flying over Uganda, a 30 mm Gatling gun fired 65 rounds per second from the ground at his plane, which took out the engine and the pilot handed him a parachute and said that they should jump.  They saw the plane smash into the ground, while they were floating down, it exploded in a violent blaze and they knew that nothing but a rubble of burnt and twisted metal was left.

They made it to the ground and the good news was that it didn’t look like the rebels were going to chase after them, but they were marooned in the jungle.  He hated snakes and there are so many snakes in the jungle, which made him glad that he grabbed his sleeping bag before he jumped.  He was numb and breathless from this ordeal when he met Niemba, an African medicine man, witch doctor or shaman who was a Zulu sangoma that diagnosed, prescribed, and performed healing rituals and who was also concerned with being able to cease any mysterious death involving his people.  Niemba had a distinctive look featuring nose bling, wearing a bone in his nose and he also had an octopus totem around his neck, that he said kept his nocturnal energies and rhythms in alignment and also resulted in heightened levels of productivity as he never wanted to be a wastrel.  Niemba agreed to be his mentor as long as he abided by the rules and this put his lifelong healing career in motion.  Niemba was vehement about his methods and he knew how to concoct many different potions and elixirs to cure almost any ailments.  The apothecary learned to appreciate the healing mysteries that Niemba revealed to him, as he certainly got his pennyworth of valuable knowledge during the time he spent in the jungle, which set a precedent for how his future would be spent.

The pilot had started calling him doctor and he waved his fists in the air and said it was time for them to leave the jungle.  He told the doctor that he a bad case of loving his estranged wife and that no medicine was going to cure his ill, except maybe a cold pint of brew.  He was a stamp collector and he thought that they should head East into Kenya, as he knew a place where he might be able to purchase some scarce and rare Kenya and Uganda stamps.  He also wanted to get back home so he could finish installing that tile project in his kitchen.  He missed his son and the first thing that he was going to do was buy him a popsicle after hugging him.

Written for Mindlovemisery’s Menagerie Wordle 202 prompts: pint, chase, fists, cease, sleeping bag, octopus, marooned, metal, breathless, pennyworth, wastrel and wanderjahr, for thehouseofbailey Destination Dreams Scotts Daily Prompt Parachute, for Daily Addictions by rogershipp prompt Rubble, for Sheryl’s A New Daily Post Word Prompt: Honorable, for FOWC with Fandango – Estranged, for Ragtag Community Precedent, for Teresa’s Haunted Wordsmith Three Things Challenge, where the three prompt words are “stamp collector, tile and popsicle”, for the secret keeper Weekly Writing Prompt #147 (5) word prompt: numb, motion, fame, rules and smash and for Word of the Day Challenge Alternative haven for the Daily Post’s mourners! Prompt Vehement.

17 thoughts on “The Apothecary

      1. I found this song titled ‘The Trees’, which features various rainforest-like effects (water droplets and so forth) and the melody soars away in the strings, reaching monumental proportions.

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